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Talk About the Weather in Turkish Like a Native

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Did you know that every minute of the day, one billion tons of rain falls on the earth? Hard to believe, considering the climate crisis! Of course, all that rain is not equally shared across the planet.

So, would you mention this fascinating fact to your new Turkish acquaintance? Well, small talk about local weather is actually a great conversation-starter. Everyone cares about the weather and you’re sure to hear a few interesting opinions! Seasons can be quite unpredictable these days and nobody knows the peculiarities of a region better than the locals.

TurkishClass101 will equip you with all the weather vocabulary you need to plan your next adventure. The weather can even be an important discussion that influences your adventure plans. After all, you wouldn’t want to get caught on an inflatable boat with a two-horsepower motor in Hurricane Horrendous!

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Table of Contents

  1. Talking about the weather in Turkey
  2. Words for the first day of spring
  3. Do You Know the Essential Summer Vocabulary?
  4. Must-Know Autumn vocabulary
  5. Winter
  6. TurkishClass101 can prepare you for any season.


1. Talking about the weather in Turkey

Talking About Weather

If you’re like me, your day’s activity plan is likely to begin with a strong local coffee and a chat about what the sky is doing. After all, being prepared could be the difference between an amazing day and a miserable one! Luckily, it’s not difficult to comment on Turkish weather - just start with these simple words and phrases.

1- The rain is falling on the street - Yağmur sokağa yağıyor.

Watercolor artists, take out your paints! You might not be able to venture out on foot today, but just embrace the rain as part of your Turkish experience. When the rain stops, the air will be clean and colours vibrant.

2- The snow has covered everything - Kar herşeyi kapladı.

A fresh blanket of snow is irresistibly beautiful. Pull on your boots and beanie, and leave your tracks in this foreign landscape. Don’t resist the urge to build a snowman – you need this!

3- Fluffy cloud - kabarık bulut

When you’re waiting for a warm beach day, fluffy white clouds in a blue sky are a good sign. Don’t forget your sunscreen, as clouds will intensify the UV rays hitting your skin.

Fluffy White Cloud in Clear Blue Sky

4- The water froze on the glass - Su bardakta dondu.

Night temperatures can get chilly and might freeze the condensation on your windows. A good way to clear them up is with warm salt water.

5- The heavy rain could cause flash flooding - Bu şiddetli yağmur ani sele neden olabilir.

If you’re visiting Turkey in the wet season, it’s important to stay informed when heavy rain sets in, so keep an eye on the weather radar. Avoid river activities and rather spend this time making a home-cooked meal and brushing up on your Turkish weather words.

Heavy Rain in a Park

6- Flood - sel

If you do get caught in a flood, your destination should no longer be ‘home’, but the nearest high ground.

7- The typhoon has hit - Tayfun vurdu.

Not all countries experience typhoons, but you need to know when to prepare for one! It will be very scary if you’ve never experienced one before. Your local neighbours are the best people to advise you on where to take shelter, as they’ve been doing it for generations. Be sure to get the low-down at the first sign of rough weather!

8- Check the weather report before going sailing - Yelkenle gitmeden önce hava raporunu kontrol edin.

When planning an outdoor activity, especially on a body of water, always be prepared for a change in the weather. Ask your hotel receptionist or neighbour where you can get a reliable daily weather report, and don’t forget your sweater!

Two Men on Sailboat

9- Today’s weather is sunny with occasional clouds - Bugünkü hava, zaman zaman bulutlu ve güneşli.

Sunny weather is the dream when traveling in Turkey! Wake up early, pack the hats and sunblock and go and experience the terrain, sights and beautiful spots. You’ll be rewarded with happy vibes all around.

10- A rainy day - yağmurlu bir gün

Remember when you said you’d save the Turkish podcasts for a rainy day? Now’s that day!

11- Scenic rainbow - manzaralı gökkuşağı

The best part about the rain is that you can look forward to your first rainbow in Turkey. There’s magic in that!

12- Flashes of lightning can be beautiful, but are very dangerous - Şimşek çakmaları güzel olabilir ama aynı zamanda tehlikelidir.

Lightning is one of the most fascinating weather phenomena you can witness without really being in danger – at least if you’re sensible and stay indoors! Did you know that lightning strikes the earth 40-50 times per second? Fortunately, not all countries experience heavy electric storms!

Electric Storm

13- 25 degrees Celsius - Yirmi beş santigrat derece

Asking a local what the outside temperature will be is another useful question for planning your day. It’s easy if you know the Turkish term for ‘degrees Celsius’.

14- Seventy-seven degrees Fahrenheit - yetmiş yedi Fahrenayt derece

Although the Fahrenheit system has been replaced by Celsius in almost all countries, it’s still used in the US and a few other places. Learn this phrase in Turkish in case one of your companions develops a raging fever.

15- A clear sky - Açık gökyüzü

Clear skies mean you’ll probably want to get the camera out and capture some nature shots - not to mention the great sunsets you’ll have later on. Twilight can lend an especially magical quality to a landscape on a clear sky day, when the light is not filtered through clouds.

Hikers on Mountain with Clear Sky

16- Light drizzle - hafif çisi

Days when it’s drizzling are perfect for taking in the cultural offerings of Turkey. You could go to the mall and watch a Turkish film, visit museums and art galleries, explore indoor markets or even find the nearest climbing wall. Bring an umbrella!

17- Temperature - sıcaklık

Because of the coronavirus, many airports are conducting temperature screening on passengers. Don’t worry though - it’s just a precaution. Your temperature might be taken with a no-touch thermometer, which measures infrared energy coming off the body.

18- Humid - nemli

I love humid days, but then I’m also a water baby and I think the two go
together like summer and rain. Find a pool or a stream to cool off in – preferably in the shade!

Humidity in Tropical Forest

19- With low humidity the air feels dry - Düşük nemli hava çok kuru hissedilir.

These are the best days to go walking the hills and vales. Just take at least one Turkish friend with you so you don’t get lost!

20- The wind is really strong - Rüzgar gerçekten şiddetli.

A strong wind blows away the air pollution and is very healthy in that respect. Just avoid the mountain trails today, unless you fancy being blown across the continent like a hot air balloon.

21- It’s windy outside - Dışarısı rüzgarlı

Wind! My least favourite weather condition. Of course, if you’re a kitesurfer, a windy day is what you’ve been waiting for!

Leaves and Umbrella in the Wind

22- Wet roads can ice over when the temperature falls below freezing - Islak yollar sıcaklık sıfırın altına düştüğünde buzlanır.

The roads will be dangerous in these conditions, so please don’t take chances. The ice will thaw as soon as the sun comes out, so be patient!

23- Today is very muggy - Bugün hava çok bunaltıcı

Muggy days make your skin feel sticky and sap your energy. They’re particular to high humidity. Cold shower, anyone? Ice vest? Whatever it takes to feel relief from the humidity!

24- Fog - sis

Not a great time to be driving, especially in unknown territory, but keep your fog lights on and drive slowly.

Fog on a Pond with Ducks

25- Hurricane - kasırga

Your new Turkish friends will know the signs, so grab some food and candles and prepare for a night of staying warm and chatting about wild weather in Turkey.

Palm Trees in a Hurricane

26- Killer tornado - Büyük hortum

If you hear these words, it will probably be obvious already that everyone is preparing for the worst! Definitely do whatever your accommodation hosts tell you to do when a tornado is expected.

27- It’s cloudy today - Bugün hava bulutlu.

While there won’t be any stargazing tonight, the magnificent clouds over Turkey will make impressive photographs. Caption them in Turkish to impress your friends back home!

Cloudy Weather on Beach with Beach Huts

28- Below freezing temperatures - dondurucu sıcaklıkların atında

When the temperature is below freezing, why not take an Uber and go shopping for some gorgeous Turkish winter gear?

Woman with Winter Gear in Freezing Weather

29- Wind chill is how cold it really feels outside - Hissedilen sıcaklık, dışarıda hissedilen gerçek sıcaklıktır

Wind doesn’t change the ambient temperature of the air, it just changes your body temperature, so the air will feel colder to you than it actually is. Not all your Turkish friends will know that, though, so learn this Turkish phrase to sound really smart!

30- Water will freeze when the temperature falls below zero degrees celsius - Su sıcaklık sıfır santigratın altına düştüğünde donar.

If you’re near a lake, frozen water is good news! Forgot your ice skates? Don’t despair - find out where you can hire some. Be cautious, though: the ice needs to be at least four inches thick for safe skating. Personally, I just slide around on frozen lakes in my boots!

Thermometer Below Freezing Point

31- Waiting to clear up - açılması için beklemek

Waiting for the weather to clear up so you can go exploring is frustrating, let’s be honest. That’s why you should always travel with two things: a scintillating novel and your Turkish Nook Book.

32- Avoid the extreme heat - aşırı sıcaktan kaçınmak

Is the heat trying to kill you? Unless you’re a hardened heatwave hero, definitely avoid activity, stay hydrated and drink electrolytes. Loose cotton or linen garb is the way to go!

Hand Holding a Melting Ice Cream

33- Morning frost - sabah kırağısı

Frost is water vapour that has turned to ice crystals and it happens when the earth cools so much in the night, that it gets colder than the air above it. Winter is coming!

34- Rain shower - sağanak yağmur

Rain showers are typically brief downpours that drench the earth with a good drink of water.

35- In the evening it will become cloudy and cold - Akşamüzeri hava bulutlanmaya başlayacak ve soğuk olacak.

When I hear this on the Turkish weather channel, I buy a bottle of wine (red, of course) and wood for the fireplace. A cold and cloudy evening needs its comforts!

Snow in the Park at Night

36- Severe thunderstorm - Şiddetli fırtına

Keep an eye on the Turkish weather maps if it looks like a big storm is coming, so you’ll be well-informed.

37- Ice has formed on the window - Camda buz oluştu

You could try this phrase out on the hotel’s helpful cleaning staff, or fix the problem yourself. Just add a scoop or two of salt to a spray bottle of water - that should work!

38- Large hailstones - Büyük dolu taneleri

As a kid, I found hail crazy exciting. Not so much now - especially if I’m on the road and large hailstones start pummeling my windscreen!

Large Hailstones on a Wooden Floor

39- Rolling thunder - şiddetli gök gürültüsü

The rumble of rolling thunder is that low-volume, ominous background sound that goes on for some time. It’s strangely exciting if you’re safely in your hotel room; it could either suddenly clear up, or escalate to a storm.

40- Sleet - Dolu

Sleet is tiny hard pieces of ice made from a mixture of rain and melted snow that froze. It can be messy, but doesn’t cause major damage the way hail does. Pretty cool to know this word in Turkish!


2. Words for the first day of spring

You know the feeling: your heart skips a beat when you wake up and spring has sprung! Spring will reward you with new blossoms everywhere, birdsong in the air, kittens being born in the neighborhood and lovely views when you hit the trails. Pack a picnic and ask a new Turkish friend to show you the more natural sights. Don’t forget a light sweater and a big smile. This is the perfect time to practice some Turkish spring words!

Spring Vocabulary


3. Do You Know the Essential Summer Vocabulary?

Summer! Who doesn’t love that word? It conjures up images of blue skies, tan skin, vacations at the beach and cruising down the coast in an Alfa Romeo, sunglasses on and the breeze in your hair. Of course, in Turkey there are many ways to enjoy the summer - it all depends on what you love to do. One thing’s for sure: you will have opportunities to make friends, go on picnics, sample delicious local ice-cream and maybe even learn to sing some Turkish songs. It’s up to you! Sail into Turkish summer with this summer vocab list, and you’ll blend in with ease.

Four Adults Playing on the Beach in the Sand


4. Must-Know Autumn vocabulary

Victoria Ericksen said, “If a year was tucked inside of a clock, then autumn would be the magic hour,” and I agree. Who can resist the beauty of fall foliage coloring the Turkish landscape? Birds prepare to migrate; travelers prepare to arrive for the best weather in Turkey.

The autumnal equinox marks the moment the Sun crosses the celestial equator, making day and night almost equal in length. The cool thing about this event is that the moon gets really bright – the ‘harvest moon’, as it’s traditionally known.

So, as much as the change of season brings more windy and rainy days, it also brings celebration. Whether you honor Thanksgiving, Halloween or the Moon Festival, take some time to color your vocabulary with these Turkish autumn words.

Autumn Phrases


5. Winter

Winter is the time the natural world slows down to rest and regroup. I’m a summer girl, but there are fabulous things about winter that I really look forward to. For one, it’s the only season I get to accessorize with my gorgeous winter gloves and snug down coat!

Then, of course, there’s ice skating, holiday decorations and bonfires. As John Steinbeck said, “What good is the warmth of summer, without the cold of winter to give it sweetness?” Get ready for the cold season with our list of essential Winter words!

Skier Sitting in the Snow


6. TurkishClass101 can prepare you for any season.

Now that you know how to inquire and comment on the weather in Turkey, you
can confidently plan your weather-ready travel itinerary. How about this for an idea: the next
time you’re sitting in a Turkish street café, try asking someone local this question:

“Do you think the weather will stay like this for a few days?”
If you loved learning these cool Turkish weather phrases with us, why not take it a step further and add to your repertoire? TurkishClass101 is here to help!

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Celebrating International Women’s Day in Turkey

Celebrating International Women’s Day in Turkey

International Women’s Day in Turkey, called Uluslararası Kadınlar Günü, is a very significant holiday, as it seeks not only to promote women’s rights, but to unite women from various backgrounds. In this article, you’ll learn all about Women’s Day, Turkey’s women’s rights, and more facts about the holiday.

Let’s get started.

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1. What is International Women’s Day?

International Women’s Day, celebrated in numerous countries around the world, is a special day set aside to honor women, show appreciation toward them, and most importantly, promote greater kadın hakları, or “women’s rights.” Women’s Day in Turkey has a particular focus on kızkardeşlik, or “sisterhood,” as women from a variety of backgrounds unite with a common goal.

Looking at the International Women’s Day history, it was first celebrated in the United States in 1909, the year that the Socialist Party of America set up an event in New York. The idea of a Women’s Day quickly spread to Europe, and many European countries celebrated their first International Women’s Day in 1911.

Since the early 2000s, women’s rights in Turkey have slowly made gains as a result of Turkey’s desire to become part of the EU. For example, in 2004, Turkey updated its laws to acknowledge the individuality of women as people, raised the legal age of marriage to eighteen, and determined that the man and woman in a marriage are equal. Later, in 2012, Turkey also signed the Istanbul Convention.

2. When is International Women’s Day?

A Group of Girls With Their Arms Around Each Other

Each year, International Women’s Day is celebrated on March 8.

3. Women’s Day Celebrations in Turkey

A Woman Smelling a Bouquet of Flowers

In Turkey, International Women’s Day is marked by many protests and marches, organized solely by women. During these protests, Turkish women speak out against and hold signs condemning many of the troubles that women in the country face. Some examples of these troubles are “domestic violence” (aile içi şiddet), “harassment” (taciz), and a remaining lack of “equality” (eşitlik) between men and women.

As we mentioned earlier, on International Women’s Day, Turkey’s women come together from various backgrounds to fight for feminism and equal rights. This is especially important, considering the discrimination often held against certain groups of women, particularly those who are nonreligious. Not only do the protests take a stand for women’s özgürlük, or “freedom,” from gender inequality, but they also promote a sense of unity and togetherness among Turkey’s feminist community.

Unfortunately, some of these protests have recently been met with violence and other forms of opposition.

4. International Women’s Day Color

Do you know what the official International Women’s Day color is?

Purple (mor) is recognized as the official color for this holiday. Other common colors that people wear on this day are white, green, pink, and sometimes red.

5. Essential Turkish Vocab for Women’s Day

Gender Signs Representing Equality on Blackboard

Ready to review some of the vocabulary words from this article? Here’s a list of the most important Turkish vocabulary for International Women’s Day!

  • Mor — “Purple”
  • Uluslararası Kadınlar Günü — “International Women’s Day”
  • Kadın — “Woman”
  • Kadın hakları — “Women’s rights”
  • Eşitlik — “Equality”
  • Oy hakkı — “Suffrage”
  • Kızkardeşlik — “Sisterhood”
  • Toplumsal cinsiyet — “Gender”
  • Özgürlük — “Freedom”
  • Taciz — “Harassment”
  • Aile içi şiddet — “Domestic violence”
  • Yürüyüş — “Parade”

To hear the pronunciation of each word, and to read them alongside relevant images, be sure to check out our Turkish International Women’s Day vocabulary list!

Final Thoughts

We hope you enjoyed learning about International Women’s Day in Turkey with us, and that you learned some valuable information today. Do you celebrate Women’s Day or a similar holiday in your country? Let us know in the comments!

If you’re fascinated with Turkish culture and want to learn more, check out the following pages on TurkishClass101.com:

Whatever your reasons for developing an interest in Turkish culture or the language, know that TurkishClass101.com is the best way to expand your knowledge and improve your skills. With tons of fun and immersive lessons for learners at every level, there’s something for everyone!

Create your free lifetime account today, and start learning with us.

Dünya Kadınlar Günü kutlu olsun! (”Happy International Women’s Day!” in Turkish) from the TurkishClass101 family!

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The Turkish Calendar: Talking About Dates in Turkish

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Did you know there are many different types of calendars?

As you probably know - a calendar is a system of organizing days in weeks and months for specific purposes, according to Wikipedia.

Worldwide, most countries use the Gregorian calendar. Some just work on the same framework, meaning that time is divided into units based on the earth’s movement around the sun - the “solar calendar”. Other calendars keep time by observing the moon’s movements, a combination of the moon and the sun’s movements, and seasons.

Through TurkishClass101, you can learn all about this and so much more! Our themed, culturally relevant lessons are skillfully designed so you can do your planning perfectly for a holiday or a date.

Having a good plan for a visit or a trip is like studying well for an exam. You’re just so much better prepared! For that, you could well need specific phrases to plan around appointments and such, especially on business trips. Make sure to use the charts we provide here with the days of the week in Turkish, as well as the months in Turkish to navigate your way as you plan. Great resources!

Also - always remember to have fun!

Table of Contents

  1. Why Will It Help To Know How To Talk About Dates in Turkish?
  2. Talking About your Plans
  3. Can TurkishClass101 Help You In Other Ways Too?

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1. Why Will It Help To Know How To Talk About Dates in Turkish?

Days of the Week

Well, that’s not a difficult question to answer. No matter why you’re travelling, it would be best to at least know the names of days and months in Turkish. You don’t want to miss your flight or an appointment because you confused “Cuma” (Friday) with “Cumartesi” (Saturday)! Or maybe you planned a holiday for “Temmuz” (July), but you booked a flight for “Haziran” (June) by accident!

Avoid this confusion by learning the Turkish calendar before you leave.

Now, as promised, the 15 phrases to help you make and discuss plans.


2. Talking About your Plans

Months of the Year

Perhaps you’re working in Turkey, or maybe you’re enjoying a prolonged holiday. Fabulous! Memorize these phrases so you can be sure to successfully negotiate meetings, appointments, dates, events, the list goes on!

1. Bu haftasonu ne yapıyorsun?

“What are you doing this weekend?”

This question is usually a preamble to inviting someone somewhere. Given that it’s over the weekend, it probably means a casual get-together or another social event. (But not necessarily! A manager or boss could also ask this for entirely different reasons.)

It’s a handy phrase to know when you’ve made Turkish or expat friends in the country. Or, be the one doing the inviting. Then train your ear to learn the following phrases so you can understand the response.

2. Bu haftasonu seyahat ediyorum.

“I am traveling this weekend.”

This could be a reply if you’re not available because you’re doing other fun stuff.

No matter why you are visiting Turkey, do take the time to explore the country! It’s beautiful and it has so many wonderful, interesting spots ready to be visited.

Couple at booking in Desk

3. Evde kalmayı planlıyorum.

“I am planning to stay at home.”

Maybe you feel unwell, but don’t want to give too much information? Or maybe you have work to do? Perhaps you just need some quiet gardening time…it doesn’t matter. This response is polite and honest without oversharing.

It could also be a slightly open-ended response, depending on how you deliver it. Because hey, being home could still mean your plans are flexible, right?

That said - depending on your relationship with the inviter, nuances like these will probably not be so apparent in a foreign culture. So, best to use this excuse for declining an invitation only if you are truly set on staying in.

Woman Doing Gardening

4. Bu hafta meşgulüm.

“This week I am busy.”

Another polite phrase that gives a reason for declining an invitation but without oversharing details.

Don’t decline too many invitations, though! You don’t want people to think that you’re too busy to hang out with them. They will stop inviting you out, and you know how the saying goes - all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy…! Being social is good for the soul.

5. Yarın boşum

“I am free tomorrow.”

Yay! Perhaps you were approached by that person and they asked about your availability for a date. This would be a fine reply. Not too eager, but still indicating that you’re interested.

Or maybe you’re just replying to a colleague or manager’s request for a meeting. Polite, honest and clear.

Alternatively, you’re just busy right now, and plans are not going the way they were…well, planned. Compromise is a lovely thing! And this phrase sounds just like that.

Use it to indicate that you want to accommodate an invitation or the inviter’s plans, despite your current unavailability. Only if you are really free, of course.

6. Bunun zamanını yeniden planlayabilir miyiz?

“Can we reschedule this?”

So, life happened and you are unable to meet obligations or attend a planned meeting. This is a suitable question to ask if you wish to indicate your willingness to still engage with whatever is on the table.

Obviously you should (ideally) not ask to reschedule a party or big meeting! (Unless you’re the boss or it’s your own party, of course.) But if there’s reasonable wiggle room regarding arrangements, then this one’s your question.

Business Man Sitting with Schedule

7. Ay sonunda yeterli zamanım olacak.

“I will have enough time at the end of the month.”

A go-to phrase when events or activities are likely to take up a lot of your time, such as going away for a weekend, spending the day at a local market, or writing your manager’s quarterly report (with 20 flow-charts in Powerpoint) - anything that won’t only take an hour or two.

8. Size en uygun zaman ne zaman?

“When is the best time that suits you?”

Remember phrase #5? That was a possible reply to this question. Asked by your crush, very possibly! Or, it could be asked by any other person for any other reason, doesn’t matter.

If this is addressed to you, it usually means that the person respects your time and schedule, which is a good thing. It probably also means that their own schedule is flexible, another good thing.

This is also a polite question to ask when a manager or senior colleague wants to meet with you. Let them decide on the time, and be as accommodating as possible. This attitude shows respect for seniority - good for career building. (Within reason, of course. You don’t need to postpone your wedding or your paid-up holiday to Australia because your manager wants to see you.)

Screen Tablet Hotel

9. Bu tarih sizin için uygun mu?

“Is this date OK with you?”

But - if the other party insists that you choose a time for a meeting, appointment, or date etc., then do so! Respond with this nice, somewhat casual question that leaves space for negotiation, but only needs a simple reply.

Suitable for friends, and casual acquaintances and colleagues.

10. O gün müsait misiniz?

“Are you available on that day?”

This is the a-bit-more-formal version of the previous question. Again, it has room for negotiation, but only needs a simple response - nice and neat!

Maybe this is the go-to question when you’re addressing your seniors at work, or a person much older than you.

11. En kısa sürede yapabilir miyiz?

“Can we do it as soon as possible?”

This question has an urgency to it that should preferably be responded to with the same. A simple reply will be good - yes or no. Less negotiable, this is still polite because it’s a question that gives you a choice.

But stand ready with one of the phrases in this article to help tie down a time and date!

Couple Getting Engaged on a Bridge

12. Her akşam müsaitim.

“I’m available every evening”

If you’re going to reply with this phrase, context is everything.

- If it’s your manager asking you to put in a bit of overtime, and you are available to - great reply! When deadlines are tight and everybody is stressing, your willingness to go the extra mile can only improve your relationship with your boss.

(Still, no need to be a doormat! If you get asked to work overtime too often, or if everyone else is goofing around while you have to graft, then re-evaluate the situation. And if you feel you’re being exploited a bit, don’t stress! Equip yourself with the diplomatic, yet assertive responses right in this article.)

- If it’s an old friend or longtime significant other asking to hang out - good reply. You know one another and appearances don’t matter any longer.

- If it’s a new crush who just asked when you’d be available for a date - stop. Not such a great reply. Tone down a bit! “Interested but not overly eager” is what you’re going for here.

Refer back to response #5, or use a counter-question, such as #1. Whatever suits you.

But if they - or anyone else - invite you to scale the Himalayas with them, then the next phrase will probably be the only sane response!

Mountaineer in Snow

13. Bunu önceden iyice planlamalıyım.

“I need to plan this well in advance.”

So, as said under #9, perhaps you’re invited to join someone conquer the Himalayas.

Or your company manager wants you to plan the Party that Tops All Year-End Parties Forever.

Simply - if you get asked to do something that you know will need a lot of thorough planning, this is a good phrase to respond with.

It’s an assertive phrase that demonstrates two things regarding your attitude:

a) That you know your own abilities, and respect your own schedule.
b) That your respect other people’s time and schedule too.

Then just be sure to actually do that planning well in advance!

14. Başka bir tarih bulmalıyız

“We need to find another date.”

So, you’re in negotiations regarding a date.

This is an assertive statement that should probably not be used with a “My way or the highway” attitude.

That stuff only works in the movies - think sharp-tongued Samuel L. Jackson. Or fierce Kristen Stewart. Yea, they can be scary, so tone down that tone.

Also, be mindful that fickle people who change plans all the time don’t keep friends! Taking others’ needs into consideration, while simultaneously having your way is a delicate art that takes proper cultivation. Use this phrase sparingly - we have better ones here to negotiate with.

Rock Concert Hands in the Air

Of course, if your planned trip to the dentist falls on the same day as the only Billie Eilish concert close by…well, priorities are priorities. Feel free to call the dentist with this phrase. Or even better, use the next one.

15. O gün yapamam.

“I cannot do it on that day.”

This is the low-key-but-still-firm cousin of the previous phrase. You’re stating a personal fact, and depending on your tone, this can be as non-negotiable as you prefer.

Again, only use this when you really mean it, if you’re visiting Turkey or any other foreign country.

So, that’s it, folks! Which phrase did you find the most helpful? Let us know in the comments!


3. Can TurkishClass101 Help You In Other Ways Too?

Numbers

Well yes, of course!

We think you will find these phrases easy to use when talking about dates and months in Turkish. But knowing how to employ them properly could help you avoid sticky situations!

TurkishClass101 is uniquely geared to help you with this and so much more.

This InnovativeLanguage.com initiative is one of many online language-learning courses. With us, you’ll find it easy and fun to learn a new language, and here are a few reasons why:

  • Immediately upon enrollment, you’ll receive hundreds of well-designed lessons to get you going.
  • Watch superb recordings of native Turkish speakers in cool slide-shows - the easy way to practice till you sound just like a native speaker yourself!
  • Also immediately upon enrollment, you’ll get access to a huge library of free resources! These include extensive, theme-based Vocabulary Lists and a Word of the Day List (For free, hot bargains!) These alone are sure to give your vocab-learning boxing gloves.
  • You’ll also immediately be able to use an excellent and free Turkish online dictionary. Necessary for quick, handy translations, no matter where you find yourself.
  • For the serious learner, there are numerous enrollment upgrades available, one of which offers you a personal, online Turkish host. Allow us to hold your hand and support you in your learning!

If you’re serious about mastering Turkish easily yet correctly, TurkishClass101 is definitely one of, if not the best, online language learning platforms available. Talking about your plans or dates in Turkish need not ever spoil your stay.

So, hurry up—enroll today!

Learn How to Talk About Your Family in Turkish

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Did you know that only some reptiles and birds don’t parent their offspring? Except for crocodiles, all reptiles (and one family of bird species called megapodes) hatch from eggs and grow up alone, without any family.

The rest of us need family if we are to survive and thrive - humans and animals alike!

At TurkishClass101, we know how important family is. Therefore, we take care to teach you all the important vocabulary and phrases pertaining to family.

Table of Contents

  1. Why Is It Important to Know Turkish Vocabulary about Family?
  2. Learn a New Culture? Learn its Family Vocab first
  3. How TurkishClass101 Can Help You Learn Turkish Family Terms

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Family Phrases in Turkish


1. Why Is It Important to Know Turkish Vocabulary about Family?

Lioness with Cub

Well, if you’re serious about studying any new language, then learning about the most important social unit in Turkish culture would be a crucial part of your education.

What is family, though? Strictly speaking, it’s a group of people who live together and are supposed to take care of one another. Some of them are genetically linked.

Family isn’t just about who we’re related to by blood, of course. It’s also one of the main influences in shaping every child’s life.

Family is Important for Children’s Healthy Development

Phrases Parents Say

Family is the single most important influence in a child’s life. Children depend on parents and family to protect them and provide for their needs from the day they were born.

Primary caregivers, which usually comprise parents and family, form a child’s first relationships. They are a child’s first teachers and are role models that show kids how to act and experience the world around them.

By nurturing and teaching children during their early years, families play an important role in making sure children are ready to learn when they enter school.

Families Can Take All Shapes and Sizes

However, the way families are put together is by no means standard.

Mom and Daughter

Single-parent and same-gender households have become a new norm the past few decades, and there’s no shame in this. When there is love, connection and proper care, a child can thrive anywhere.

Everyone also knows that sometimes friends can become like family and remain with us for life, because it’s all about human connection.

After all, we share many commonalities simply because we’re human, and we are programmed to connect with one another and belong to a group. This is very important for our well-being and survival.

It’s All About Feeling Connected

As John Northman, a psychologist from Buffalo, NY, told WebMD - feeling connected to others contributes to mental as well as physical health.

He pointed out that when people feel connected, they feel better physically, and they’re also less likely to feel depressed.

Couples Chatting

Or, if they do feel depressed, they’d be in a better position to get out of it when they feel they are connecting with others. This is because they would be psychologically supported too, Northman said.

There has even been some links drawn between addiction and feeling disconnected from others. According to an article in Psychology Today, research indicates that addiction is not solely a substance disorder, but also affected by people feeling insecurely attached to others.

It showed that securely attached individuals tend to feel comfortable in and enjoy life, while insecurely attached people typically struggle to fit in and connect.


2. Learn a New Culture? Learn its Family Vocab first

So, it’s clear that for most of us, family is our entry point into connection and belonging. This is true of every culture, so in every country, family takes prominence.

For this reason, TurkishClass101 offers culturally-relevant lessons that will equip you well to understand families in Turkey.

Here are some of the most important Turkish vocabulary and quotes about family and parenting!

A) Turkish Family Vocabulary

Let’s start with the basic vocabulary. Without this collection of words, you’ll have a hard time describing any member of your family at all.

Family Terms
Family
aile
Great grandfather
büyük büyükbaba
Mother
anne
Grandmother
büyük büyükanne
Father
baba
Grandfather
dede
Wife
Grandchild
torun
Husband
koca
Granddaughter
kız torun
Parent
ebeveyn
Grandson
erkek torun
Child
çocuk
Aunt
teyze
Daughter
kız
Uncle
amca
Sister
kız kardeşler
Niece
yeğen
Brother
erkek kardeş
Nephew
yeğen
Younger sister
kız kardeş
Younger brother
erkek kardeş
Older brother
ağabey
Great grandmother
büyük büyükanne
Cousin
kuzen
Mother-in-law
kayınvalide
Father-in-law
kayınpeder
Sister-in-law
baldız
Brother-in-law
kayınbirader
Partner

Family of Three

B) Quotes About Family

Turkish Family Quotes

One of the ways to improve your Turkish language skills is by memorizing quotes from books, or poems.

Either source some from Turkish literature, or make use of ours!

Aileni seçemezsin. Onlar Tanrı’nın sana hediyeleridir; tıpkı senin onlara olduğun gibi.

“You don’t choose your family. They are God’s gift to you, as you are to them.” - Desmond Tutu

Aile önemli bir şey değildir. O, her şeydir.

“Family is not an important thing. It’s everything.” - Michael J. Fox

Aile demek kimsenin geride kalmaması veya unutulmaması demektir.

“Family means no one gets left behind or forgotten.” - David Ogden Stiers

Ailem benim hem gücüm hem zayıf noktam.

“My family is my strength and my weakness.” - Aishwarya Rai

Aile doğanın başyapıtlarından biridir.

“The family is one of nature’s masterpieces.” - George Santayana

Bela gelince, sizi destekleyen ailenizdir.

“When trouble comes, it’s your family that supports you.” - Guy Lafleur

Insan toplumunun ilk temel hücresi ailedir.

“The family is the first essential cell of human society.” - Pope John XXIII

Tüm aile için eğlenceli bir şey yoktur.

“There is no such thing as fun for the whole family.” - Jerry Seinfeld

Onurunu savunmak zorundasın. Ve aileni de.

“You have to defend your honor. And your family.” - Suzanne Vega

Bütün mutlu aileler birbirine benzer; mutsuz her aile kendine göre mutsuzdur.

“All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” - Leo Tolstoy

C) Test Your Knowledge!

Do you feel you have learned a lot in this blog? Let’s quickly test that!

In the table below, match the Turkish vocabulary on the left with the definition of the relative in the right column.

MY RELATIVES
Relative Name Definition
1. aile a. My male child
2. anne b. My older male sibling
3. baba c. My female sibling
4. eş d. My child’s child
5. koca e. My child’s female child
6. ebeveyn f. My female parent
7. çocuk g. My grandparent’s mother
8. kız h. Mother to one of my parents
9. erkek evlat i. Relatives
10. kız kardeşler j. My female child
11. erkek kardeş k. My younger male sibling
12. kız kardeş l. Male spouse
13. erkek kardeş m. The father of one of my parents
14. ağabey n. My child’s male child
15. büyük büyükanne o. My children’s father or mother
16. büyük büyükbaba p. The sister of one of my parents
17. büyükanne q. The brother of one of my parents
18. dede r. My male parent
19. torun s. My sibling’s female child
20. kız torun t. My sibling’s male child
21. erkek torun u. My male sibling
22. teyze v. My parents’ sibling’s child
23. amca w. Female spouse
24. yeğen x. The grandfather of one of my parents
25. yeğen y. The person I am a parent to
26. kuzen z. My younger female sibling

How did it go? Don’t worry if you had trouble with it - you’ll get there! With a bit of practice, and our help at TurkishClass101, you’ll soon have these family terms under the belt.

Family Shopping


3. How TurkishClass101 Can Help You Learn Turkish Family Terms

We hope that we helped you expand your family in Turkish vocabulary!

TurkishClass101, with its innovative online learning system, stands out among online learning platforms to help you master Turkish easily.

Our lessons are tailored not only to increase your language skills, but to also inform you of Turkish culture, including the Turkish family structure.

When you sign up, you will get instant access to tools like:

1 - An extensive vocabulary list, regularly updated
2 - A new Turkish word to learn every day
3 - Quick access to the Turkish Key Phrase List
4 - A free Turkish online dictionary
5 - The excellent 100 Core Turkish Word List
6 - An almost limitless Lesson Library for learners of all levels

Further speed up your learning with the help of a personal tutor, who will first assess your current Turkish language abilities to personalize your training and tailor it to your needs.

Hard work always pays off, and to help you in this, TurkishClass101 will be there every step of the way toward your Turkish mastery!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Family Phrases in Turkish

Answers: 1.i. 2.f. 3.r. 4.w. 5.l. 6.o. 7.y. 8.j. 9.a. 10.c. 11.u. 12.z. 13.k. 14.b. 15.g 16.x. 17.h. 18.m. 19.d. 20.e. 21.n. 22.p. 23.q. 24.s. 25.t. 26.v.

TurkishClass101’s Essential Turkish Travel Phrase Guide

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Traveling to foreign countries is nearly always an exciting, enriching, and beneficial experience. Yet, some things can be real downers, such as boredom on a lengthy flight to Turkey. Really, binge-watching onboard movies can only be interesting for so long! And jet lag - another huge downer. Did you know that jet lag is more severe when you travel from the West to the East?

Well, we won’t know how to beat that, but there are fortunately plenty of remedies around to investigate.

To beat flight boredom, though, we may have the answer for you at TurkishClass101! Why don’t you take the time to study Turkish travel phrases? We make this super easy and fun, with great downloadables, like our PDF Cheat Sheets. Quickly memorize these, and impress your Turkish friends or travel guide with your flawless Turkish!

Table of Contents

  1. Importance Of Learning Travel Phrases
  2. 13 Must-Have Travel Phrases and Words
  3. Good-To-Have Travel Phrases
  4. Ways To Improve Communication in a Foreign Country
  5. TurkishClass101 Can Help You Master Travel Phrases Easily and Effortlessly!

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1. Importance Of Learning Travel Phrases

Impressing Turkish people or your travel partners will be the least of the benefits you reap from learning these helpful phrases. These are greater ones:

1) Eliminate Travel Frustration: First of all, you’ll be able to cut out a good chunk of travel frustration and inconvenience due to language barriers.

Know how to pronounce and use at least the basic Turkish phrases, and then just look foreign. This should go a long way to help you get by and win you friends, because locals would be more inclined to help someone who took the trouble to learn a smidgen of their language.

Injured Woman In An Ambulance

2) Emergency Readiness: In case of an emergency, you will be able to get help a lot quicker if you know how to ask for what in Turkish. Imagine miming to a doctor or nurse that you have a sore ear but that you’re allergic to penicillin. Not so easy, right?

Rather, you should know basic emergency travel phrases, especially if you suffer from a serious condition. Also, information about life-threatening allergies you have should always be on your person in the language of the country you’re visiting.

3) Sight-Seeing Readiness: Hopefully, you also travel to learn more about a country’s culture. Visiting the main tourist sites in Turkey will be more interesting if you know how to ask pertinent questions in Turkish.

In this blog, we’ll also be giving you important travel phrases to consider - from the 13 essential must-have phrases to ones that are just generally useful and good to know.

Let’s get cracking!


2. 13 Must-Have Travel Phrases and Words

Preparing to Travel

Seasoned explorers of multiple countries will tell you that certain words and phrases are absolute must-knows in anyone’s travel vocabulary. Learning from them, we collated some of the most essential ones here for you.

If you know these travel phrases and words by heart in Turkish, you will be much better equipped for your visit than most of your movie-binging travel mates.

1) Teşekkür ederim (Thank you)

As a tourist, you will be relying on the kindness of strangers to get by. Repay them with a small acknowledgment of their friendly generosity - know how to say “thank you” in Turkish.

2) İngilizce konuşuyor musunuz? (Do you speak English?)

While it may be a bit of a cop-out, sometimes you just can’t figure out how to communicate. Maybe you’re blanking on one specific word you need, maybe they’re speaking with a heavy accent, or maybe it’s just really late and you really want to get to the hotel. In that case, try asking if they speak English, and hopefully you can make things a little bit simpler for yourself.

Don’t abuse this phrase, though! If you just try to get by without learning any of the local language, not only will you not learn anything - you’ll be out of luck if they can’t speak English!

Man Greeting Someone

3) Havalimanından şehre otobüs var mı? (Is there a bus from the airport to the city?)

Public transit is usually cheaper, if slower, than taking a taxi or rideshare. Use this phrase to see if you can get where you’re going when you’re strapped for cash, or just when you’d like to take the scenic route into town!

4) Havalimanı için doğru otobüs bu mu? (Is this the right bus for the airport?)

Likewise, if you’re the kind of person who can get themselves moving early (or maybe you just have a late flight), maybe you want to take the bus to the airport rather than taking a cab. If that’s the case, you’ll want to be sure you’re actually heading the right way! You wouldn’t want to end up at a lookout point half an hour away, watching your flight take off in the distance, would you?

5) Affedersiniz, bilet ücreti kadar? (Excuse me, what’s the fare?)

If you are paying for a cab, you’ll want to know how much. Most legal taxis will have meters, but when dealing with a currency you’re not familiar with, it can be worth asking just to double check that you’re paying the right amount - especially if the currency has cents.

6) Rezervasyonum var (I have a reservation)

This one you can expect to use at least a few times throughout your trip, unless you’re the kind of person who travels by the seat of their pants and just goes to whatever hotel, motel, or hostel has rooms available.

7) Bu gece için boş odanız var mı? (Do you have any vacancies tonight?)

If that’s the case, you’ll definitely be using this phrase instead. Quite possibly a lot, depending on how lucky you are!

Couple with a Map

8 ) Tren istasyonu nerede? (Where is the train station?)

If you’re in a country with an expansive commuter rail system (or maybe just a fan of other types of locomotives), you may want to know where the closest station is. Just don’t go looking for pennies on the rails!

9) Benim fıstığa alerjim var (I am allergic to peanuts)

Replace “peanuts” with whatever the word for your allergen may be. If your allergy is serious, you probably already know the importance of stating this very clearly in Turkish.

If the condition is life-threatening, be sure to have a letter or prescription from a medical professional in Turkish on your person at all times. Consider getting a medical alert bracelet specially made in Turkish if your stay will be longer than a month or so.

Person Declining Meat

10) Herhangi bir vejetaryen yemeği var mı? (Do you have any vegetarian dishes?)

If you dislike eating certain things, or you have certain dietary restrictions, it would be best if you knew how to convey this clearly in Turkish.

Remember, though, that saying “I’m vegan” or “I’m diabetic” may not be enough to get you what you want. The rules for veganism and vegetarianism are not standard everywhere in the world. Also, your patron might not understand what “diabetic” means. If you have a medical condition, it would be best to research some in-depth vocabulary beforehand.

11) Harita alabilir miyim? (Could I get a map?)

Planning on exploring your destination? Hopelessly lost? Maybe just an amateur cartographer? No matter the reason, this phrase is sure to come in handy. That said, you’re more likely to get use out of it at some sort of tourist or travel center than you are asking a random passerby on the street.

12) Bu ne kadar? (How much is this?)

Even if you’re not a big shopper, you’re probably going to need this phrase at some point. Knowing how to count in Turkish will, of course, help a lot with purchases too.

13) Kredi kartı kabul ediyor musunuz? (Do you take credit card?)

This is another travel phrase that will smooth your monetary transactions considerably.

Man Giving Credit Card to a Clerk


3. Good-To-Have Travel Phrases

Travel Verbs

Unlike the previous phrases, these are not really essential so much as they are useful. Yet, knowing these will still smooth over some bumps on your journey, more than just knowing the crucial phrases would.

1) Wi-Fi ücretsiz mi? (Is the Wi-Fi free?)

If you’re abroad, your normal cellular plans probably won’t have any service, and you’ll be totally reliant on publically available Wi-Fi while you’re out and about. Just ask a server, clerk, or attendant, and they’ll be happy to let you know. Just make sure you’re paying attention when they tell you the password!

2) Bir resmimi çekebilir misiniz, lütfen (Could you take a picture of me please?)

What would a trip be with no photos to commemorate the event? Just be sure to ask this of someone who actually looks like they’d be willing to, unless you’re willing to risk being given the cold shoulder or worse. If you’re at a tourist attraction, you’ll find that most people are more than happy to take one for you, so long as you take one of them as well!

3) Öneriniz var mı? (Do you have any recommendations?)

Eating alone in a restaurant? Or going out with new Turkish friends or business colleagues? Let them help you decide what to have.

4) Ben sigara içilmeyen koltuk istiyorum, lütfen (I’d like to have a non-smoking seat, please)

Though smoking has gone out of fashion in some places, it’s still popular in others. In the event you’re at a restaurant where smoking is allowed on premises, you can always ask this question to the staff and be seated elsewhere.

5) Su, lütfen (Water, please)

If you’ve emptied your glass, or are cutting yourself off after a few drinks, you can always ask for some water. It can be especially useful if the restaurant is busy to the point you need to call out to someone to get service.

6) Ben hesabı alabilir miyim? (Could I have the check?)

To finish off the restaurant related phrases, if you’re eating with friends or really want to impress your colleagues, taking the bill can be a nice treat for them. Of course, this phrase could come in handy as well if you’re eating alone and you’re just impatient to leave.

7) Bir hediyelik eşya olarak ne tavsiye edersiniz? (What do you recommend for a souvenir?)

Now that your trip is over, what better way to cap it all off than a memento, or maybe a gift for friends and family at home? It’ll be nicer to have something recommended by the locals than a cheap bauble from the airport store, so go ahead and ask someone you’ve met what they think.


4. Ways To Improve Communication in a Foreign Country

Survival Phrases

When traveling, it’s possible to keep communication smooth when you don’t share a language.

Do so by keeping these five tips in mind. They are aimed to help you communicate with those who cannot speak English very well, and also to keep your traveling experience pleasant!

1. Keep your English simple and easy to understand.
If the person you are talking to speaks very little English, use basic verbs, adjectives, and nouns, and keep sentences short.

However, don’t patronize them by talking in pidgin or like you would address a child. Keep your speech simple but natural, and use the correct grammar.

For instance, don’t say: “You come when?”. If you say: “When will you come?”, you will very likely be understood, and may even help someone who wants to improve their English.

2. Ask someone to write information down.
Apply Rule 1 first at your hotel, where the staff is very likely to be able to speak some English. Get them to write down, in their native language, things like: “I would like to go to the airport, please,” “Please take me to the beach,” or “Where is the closest bathroom?”

These written questions are something you can then give to taxi drivers or any other people who are willing and able to help you. This simple step could make your life a lot easier when you travel to a foreign country!

3. Avoid asking leading questions!
If you want the correct information from a non-native English speaker, that is.

When you need directions, for instance, don’t ask: “To get to the bus stop, do I need to turn left here?” If the person didn’t really understand you, you will probably just get a smile and a “Yes,” which could possibly make you miss your bus.

Rather, you should ask: “Where is the bus stop?” If they understand you, you will get the correct directions.

4. Pick the right person to ask for help.
Time to look at people and think a bit about their appearance! A younger person who looks like they might be a student is more likely to have English skills than the friendly but ancient lady smiling at you from a fruit stall.

If you don’t see anyone like that, head into town to the nearest bank, hospital, pharmacy, or hotel. The staff at those places usually speak a bit of English.

5. Know when to quit.
If you stuck to the above rules, but the person you are talking to only stares at you blankly, say thank you and leave. Hanging around hoping someone will suddenly understand and respond is just wasting your time, and may irritate them as well. Go find someone else.


5. TurkishClass101 Can Help You Master Travel Phrases Easily and Effortlessly!

So, reader, have you found this article helpful?

Do you feel comfortable enough to use some essential travel phrases in Turkish? We’d also love to hear if you think we left out important travel phrases. Leave your suggestions and opinions in the comments!

TurkishClass101 takes the lead with many free learning tools to help you master Turkish reading and speaking easily, and in fun ways.

These tools include:

- An extensive vocabulary list, regularly updated
- A new Turkish word to learn every day
- Quick access to the Turkish Key Phrase List
- A free Turkish online dictionary
- The excellent 100 Core Turkish Word List
- An almost limitless Lesson Library for learners of all levels

You will also have access to topic-specific recordings like our Before You Travel: Survival Phrases lesson.

Learn even more efficiently with the help of a personal tutor, after taking an assessment test to personalize and tailor your training.

Getting a tutor is also a good option if you meet challenges in your learning, or need to fast-track correct pronunciation and diction. Your very own friendly, Turkish-speaking teacher will be only a text away on a special app, anywhere, anytime - an excellent option for business persons!

Using a guided learning system that was developed by experts in language and online education, you’ll receive personal feedback and constant support to improve in no time. You’ll also be tasked with weekly assignments in reading, writing, and speaking to hone your Turkish speaking skills.

Imagine how impressed your Turkish friends or colleagues will be when you display your excellent conversational skills! With TurkishClass101, getting there will be easy and fun.

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Holidays in Turkey: Atatürk Remembrance Day

Every year, the Turkish people commemorate one of the greatest leaders the country has known: Mustafa Kemal Ataturk. In this article, you’ll learn about how Turkey honors Ataturk’s memory, and explore some of Ataturk’s contributions to Turkey—and the world. In short, you’ll gain a clear picture of what the Turkish people remember Ataturk for, and why it’s significant.

As any successful language-learner can tell you, understanding a country’s culture is a step you can’t miss!

At TurkishClass101.com, we hope to make every aspect of your language-learning journey both fun and informative! Let’s get started, and delve into this Turkish national holiday.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Turkish

1. What is Atatürk Remembrance Day?

Mustafa Kemal Atatürk passed away of cirrhosis on November 10, 1938, at 09:05 in Dolmabahçe Palace. His casket, draped in a flag, was placed on a catafalque for a moment, while residents of Istanbul mourned deeply. Following the funeral prayer and cortege, during his mausoleum’s construction, Atatürk rested in a marble tomb in the Ethnography Museum of Ankara for fifteen years. After the completion of Anıtkabir, his casket was transferred to his final resting place.

Mustafa Kemal Atatürk was not only an extraordinary leader and a revolutionary officer, who advocated peace, democracy, secularism, basic rights, and freedom, but he was also an academic research enthusiast. Even though today he might be considered to be ultra-nationalistic by some, he has always been admired and respected internationally as a leader, for his long-sightedness, ideas, and military achievements. One of his most famous sayings summarizes his ideas: “Peace at home, peace in the world.”

Mustafa Kemal was granted his surname, which is the combination of the words “father” and “Turk,” by the parliament right after the surname law in 1934.

2. When is Ataturk Commemoration Day?

The Turkish Flag

Turks celebrate Ataturk Remembrance Day each year on November 10, the date of this beloved figure’s death.

3. Ataturk Memorial Day Traditions & Celebrations

Placing a Wreath

Every year on November 10 at exactly 09:05, sirens sound throughout the country. All traffic stops, drivers and travelers get out of their vehicles, and people in their offices take a break and stand up. In schools, students will already be expecting this time and join the rest of the country.

Life stops at this time, and while the sirens wail, everybody in the country stands up as a gesture of respect. Following the sirens, in schools and government agencies, people sing the National Anthem.

4. Six Important Ataturk Principles

Can you name the six principles of Atatürk’s that have affected recent Turkish history?

These principles are:

  1. Republicanism
  2. Populism
  3. Secularism
  4. Reformism
  5. Nationalism
  6. Statism

5. Must-Know Vocabulary for Ataturk Remembrance Day

Ataturk

Here’s some essential vocabulary for Ataturk Remembrance Day!

  • Mustafa Kemal Atatürk — “Mustafa Kemal Ataturk”
  • Türk Bayrağı — “Turkish flag”
  • Anıtkabir’e çelenk koymak — “Place a wreath on the Mausoleum of Ataturk”
  • Yas tutma — “Mourning”
  • Saygı duruşu — “Moment of silence”
  • Askeri geçit — “Military parade”
  • Bayrak asmak — “Fly a flag”
  • Bayrak sallama — “Flag-waving”
  • Anma töreni — “Commemorative ceremony”
  • Atatürk büstü — “Bust of Ataturk”
  • Atatürk rozeti — “Ataturk badge”
  • İstiklal Marşı — “Turkish National Anthem”
  • Anıtkabir — “The Mausoleum of Ataturk”

To hear the pronunciation of each word, and to see them accompanied by relevant images, visit our Ataturk Remembrance Day vocabulary list!

Final Thoughts

We hope you enjoyed learning about this Turkish national holiday with us!

Did you learn anything new? Does your country have a similar holiday celebrating a beloved historical figure? Let us know in the comments! We always look forward to hearing from you!

Being able to discover a country’s culture may be the most rewarding and exciting aspect of trying to master its language. If more cultural information is what you’re after, be sure to check out the following pages on TurkishClass101.com:

For even more Turkish learning opportunities, be sure to create a free basic account today! By upgrading to Premium Plus, you can further accelerate your learning with your own personal Turkish tutor. You really can master the language, and we’ll be here with constant support and effective learning materials every step of the way!

Happy Turkish learning!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Turkish

How to Use Turkish Numbers for Daily Usage

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Especially if you’re planning a prolonged visit to Turkey, using the correct Turkish numbers for counting in Turkish could be very important! Number systems are the other alphabet in any language. In fact, it is a language all of its own, and it serves a multitude of excellent purposes.

Table of Contents

  1. A Brief History of Counting and Number Systems
  2. Why is it Important to Learn Turkish Numbers?
  3. Learning Turkish Numbers
  4. Why Choose TurkishClass101 to Learn all about Turkish Numbers?

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Count to One Billion in Turkish


1. A Brief History of Counting and Number Systems

Abacus

1. The Ishango Bone

The origin of counting, and with it numbers, is not clear to historians. While their art showed that prehistoric man had a concept of numbers, the first indication of a formal system was found to be only between 20,000 and 35,000 thousand years old. This discovery came around 1960 in the form of the so-called Ishango Bone found in the Congo, Central Africa.

The 10cm/4 inch piece of bone was a fibula from a baboon. It showed markings with a neat, unified pattern of small lines - far too organized and sophisticated to have formed spontaneously. Archeologists believe that those thin markings were carved to keep score of, or count, something. The lines seemed to represent a sequence of prime numbers and a series of duplications. Some even called it the first-ever pocket calculator!

2. Mesopotamia and Greece

Yet, evidence suggests that it wasn’t until about 4,000 years ago that humans truly started counting and using numbers. Together with the development of civilization came developed agriculture, and the need for measurement and score-keeping was increased.

For this reason, a formal number system and mathematics were developed first in the Middle East, in what was then called Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia was roughly situated in the area of modern-day Iraq and Kuwait. Allegedly, the system was pretty simple at first. Citizens used tokens that represented a certain number of items, such as one token equalling four goats, etc. This eventually evolved into a system of score marks pressed into clay, which ultimately went on to influence Greek mathematics.

3. Hindu-Arabic Numbers

Zero, meanwhile, was conceived later and elsewhere. Inspired by the Hindu religion, which allows for the concept of infinity and eternity, the Indians invented a symbol to represent nothing. The magic of the zero lies not in itself but its combination with other numbers.

The Indians were also the creators of today’s numbers, which are often referred to as Hindu-Arabic numbers. These comprise one or a combination of just ten symbols or digits: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 0.

Europe learned of this numeric system only around 1200 A.D., when they were introduced to it by an Italian mathematician called Leonardo Pisano Bigollo.

Pisano, also known as Fibonacci, is famous for the discovery of a mathematical sequence with countless applications. Yes, math buffs, it’s the well-known Fibonacci sequence, also called the Golden Mean.

The Roman numeric system, which was clumsy next to the newer inventions, gradually lost popularity in the West. It’s from here that they “slowly spread to conquer the world,'’ as Steven Law puts it.


2. Why is it Important to Learn Turkish Numbers?

For us at TurkishClass101, this is an easy question to answer! Because we know that numbers are a global unifier.

Counting and numbers have made our lives easier since they were first formulated, even in their most primitive forms.

Numbers in Industry

Without knowing your numbers, you can’t properly communicate about or deal with the following:

1) Your date/time of birth, i.e., your age: This is vital information to be able to give to people like doctors, employers, law enforcement, and so forth.

2) Banking: Worldwide, our monetary systems are built on numbers. Interest, credit scores, and loans all rely on math beyond simple finger counting.

3) Time: Without knowing how to say numbers, you can’t talk or ask about the time and expect to get a useful response. You don’t want to miss an appointment or schedule something for the wrong hour!

4) Ordering data: Numbers bring order to a mostly random life! Scientists even say that numbers and the way they are organized underpin the whole universe. From using them to count your meals’ calories and the number of likes your posts get on social media, to drawing up intricate data charts and explaining existence itself - numbers are what makes these things possible.

All of the above and more are reasons why it is important to know your numbers if you plan on travelling or becoming a foreign worker abroad, in Turkey or anywhere else!

Little Girl Counting


3. Learning Turkish Numbers

Now, let’s explore the Turkish number system a bit more! Take a look at this infographic.

Language Numbers

Can you make out for yourself what the Turkish numbers between one (1) and nine (9) look and sound like? Easy, right?

Or, if you struggled a bit, no problem. Why not listen to how Turkish numbers one (1) through ten (10) sound when pronounced by our native Turkish speaker and friendly TurkishClass101 teacher?

Then, share with us in the comments your native language’s romanized pronunciation of your number system. We’d love to see all the different ways the same numbers can be pronounced!

Hand With a Thumbs Up

When you have mastered the first ten numbers, you have basically nailed the most significant part of the number system. Well done! Curious to learn the numbers from eleven upward? No problem! Why not subscribe and enroll with us now to immediately enjoy this lesson, teaching you all about Turkish numbers eleven (11) to one hundred (100)?

Finally, if you’re curious how the numbers look once you’ve broken one hundred, why not check out our Turkish number vocabulary page? You can see the numbers we’ve just covered, all the way up to four thousand (4,000). Plus, you can also see the Turkish words for different numbers used in example sentences, to get an idea of how you can use them in your day-to-day conversations!


4. Why Choose TurkishClass101 to Learn all about Turkish Numbers?

TurkishClass101, like all Innovative Language Learning ventures, takes the pain out of learning a new language by adding a lot of fun. It’s never an easy thing to learn a new language, but we formulated all your lessons so they’re nicely bite-sized, and geared to keep you motivated!

Also, we created a great number of fantastic tools to help keep struggle and boredom out of the learning process.

  • Fun and Easy Learning: It’s a commonly-known fact that when learning is made easy and fun, student motivation rises. And as motivation rises, so does the effort to learn - what a beautiful cycle! TurkishClass101’s language learning system is designed to get you speaking from the onset. Learn at your own convenience and pace with our short, effective, and fun audio podcast lessons. Our Learning Center is comprehensive and state-of-the-art, with a vibrant user community to connect with! Our lessons are recorded with native hosts and voice actors, providing a diverse range of dialects in your lessons. You can be confident that native speakers will understand you when speaking Turkish!
  • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android, and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
  • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Turkish with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account - for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Turkish dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about TurkishClass101…!
  • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. You can have your very own Turkish teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to - what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
  • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Turkish word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Turkish level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

So, why wait? Sign up with TurkishClass101 right away! Also, let us know in the comments if you’ve used this blog post, or any of the free lessons anywhere to master Turkish numbers. Or, even better - share your birthdate using what you’ve learned!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Count to One Billion in Turkish

How To Post In Perfect Turkish on Social Media

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You’re learning to speak Turkish, and it’s going well. Your confidence is growing! So much so that you feel ready to share your experiences on social media—in Turkish.

At Learn Turkish, we make this easy for you to get it right the first time. Post like a boss with these phrases and guidelines, and get to practice your Turkish in the process.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Turkish

1. Talking about Your Restaurant Visit in Turkish

Eating out is fun, and often an experience you’d like to share. Take a pic, and start a conversation on social media in Turkish. Your friend will be amazed by your language skills…and perhaps your taste in restaurants!

Barış eats at a restaurant with his friends, posts an image of the group, and leaves this comment:

POST

Let’s break down Barış’s post.

Arkadaşlarla rakı-balık keyfi.
“Raki and fish feast with friends.”

1- arkadaşlarla

First is an expression meaning “with friends.”
The first word means “friends” and the suffix -la at the end means “with.”

2- rakı-balık keyfi

Then comes the phrase - “raki and fish feast.”
“Rakı-balık” is a very common expression. Rakı is a popular alcoholic drink in Turkey and other Balkan countries. It is a Turkish national drink and is usually consumed with fish and small side dishes called meze. “Keyif” means pleasure, and it is one of the most common expressions on Turkish social media. For example, “kahve keyfi” (coffee pleasure), “alışveriş keyfi” (shopping pleasure). When “keyif” is used in a noun compound, as in this case, it takes the suffix -i, and as a rule the “i” inside “keyif” drops. “Rakı-balık” + “keyif” becomes “rakı-balık keyfi”.

COMMENTS

In response, Barış’s friends leave some comments.

1- Afiyet olsun canım.

His neighbor, Zeynep, uses an expression meaning - “Bon appetit, dear.”
This is a well-known loan-expression from French that means “Eat well”. Use it with a term of endearment to show friendly affection.

2- Bizi çağırmak yok mu?

His college friend, Can, uses an expression meaning - “You are not inviting us?”
Use this expression if you are feeling left out.

3- Çok lezzetli görünüyor.

His girlfriend’s high school, Seda, uses an expression meaning - “It looks very delicious.”
Use this expression to agree with the poster.

4- Afiyet olsun. Cansu Hanım’a selamlar.

His supervisor, Orhan, uses an expression meaning - “Bon appetit. Give my regards to Ms. Cansu.”
Again, the French loan-expression, together with a formal greeting.

VOCABULARY

Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • keyif: “pleasure”
  • Afiyet: “Appetite”
  • çağırmak: “to invite”
  • lezzetli: “delicious”
  • selamlar: “regards”
  • So, let’s practice a bit. If a friend posted something about having dinner with friends, which phrase would you use?

    Now go visit a Turkish restaurant, and wow the staff with your language skills!

    2. Post about Your Mall Visit in Turkish

    Another super topic for social media is shopping—everybody does it, most everybody loves it, and your friends on social media are probably curious about your shopping sprees! Share these Turkish phrases in posts when you visit a mall.

    Cansu shop with her sister at the mall, posts an image of the two of them, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Cansu’s post.

    Abla-kardeş alışverişteyiz.
    “The sisters have gone shopping.”

    1- abla-kardeş

    First is an expression meaning “elder sister - younger sibling”.
    Abla means “elder sister” and kardeş means “sibling”. Since it doesn’t give a hint about the gender of the younger sibling, this expression can be used for elder sisters and brothers, too. In our case it’s two sisters.

    2- alışverişteyiz

    Then comes the phrase - “We have gone shopping.”
    “Alışveriş” means “shopping” and “alışverişte” means “during shopping.” There’s “-yiz” at the end is the suffix for first person plural with buffer consonant “y”. Note that the vowels in suffixes may change according to Turkish vowel harmony rules.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Cansu’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Eyvah!

    Her boyfriend, Barış, uses an expression meaning - “Oh, no!”
    Use this expression to joke a bit with the poster.

    2- Bir dahaki sefere beni de çağırın.

    Her high school friend, Seda, uses an expression meaning - “Next time, call me, too.”
    Use this expression if you wish to be included in the poster’s plans.

    3- İyi alışverişler.

    Her neighbor, Zeynep, uses an expression meaning - “Happy shopping.”
    Use this expression if you are feeling warmhearted.

    4- Hangi AVM?

    Her boyfriend’s college friend, Can, uses an expression meaning - “Which mall?”
    Use this question if you want more information.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • abla: “elder sister”
  • eyvah: “alas, oh no”
  • bir dahaki sefere: “next time”
  • alışveriş: “shopping”
  • AVM: “Mall”
  • So, if a friend posted something about going shopping, which phrase would you use?

    3. Talking about a Sport Day in Turkish

    Sports events, whether you’re the spectator or the sports person, offer fantastic opportunity for great social media posts. Learn some handy phrases and vocabulary to start a sport-on-the-beach conversation in Turkish.

    Barış plays with his friends at the beach, posts an image of the team, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Barış’s post.

    Açık havada spor yapmak gibisi yok!
    “Nothing compares to doing outdoor sports!”

    1- Açık havada spor yapmak

    First is an expression meaning “to do outdoor sports”.
    In Turkey people generally love outdoor activities.

    2- gibisi yok

    Then comes the phrase - “nothing compares to.”
    This is a very common expression. You can combine it with your hobbies or the things you like. Just make sure the first part is either a noun or a verb in dictionary form, ending with -mek or -mak.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Barış’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Barış Abi, formdan düşmüşsün.

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Berke, uses an expression meaning - “Barış, you’re out of shape.”
    Use this expression to joke with and tease the poster.

    2- Ne güzel bronzlaşmışsınız.

    His neighbor, Zeynep, uses an expression meaning - “You’ve got a nice tan.”
    Use this expression to compliment the poster.

    3- Bakıyorum keyifler yerinde.

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Seda, uses an expression meaning - “As far as I can see, you’re having a good time.”
    Use this expression to make casual conversation.

    4- Keyifli tatiller!

    His supervisor, Orhan, uses an expression meaning - “Have an enjoyable holiday!”
    This is a slightly formal well-wish.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • Açık hava: “open air”
  • formdan düşmek: “being out of shape”
  • bronzlaşmak: “to get a tan”
  • tatil: “holiday”
  • Which phrase would you use if a friend posted something about sports?

    But sport is not the only thing you can play! Play some music, and share it on social media.

    4. Share a Song on Social Media in Turkish

    Music is the language of the soul, they say. So, don’t hold back—share what touches your soul with your friends!

    Cansu shares a song she just heard at a party, posts an image of the artist, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Cansu’s post.

    Güne enerjik başlamak için harika bir şarkı.
    “A great song to start your day with energy.”

    1- Güne enerjik başlamak için

    First is an expression meaning “to start the day.”
    In Turkey being energetic is a very desirable trait. Recipes and tips on how to have more energy often show up on TV and newspapers.

    2- harika bir şarkı

    Then comes the phrase - “a great song.”
    In most cases, “bir,” which corresponds to the article “a” in English, comes between the adjective and its noun.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Cansu’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Bomba.

    Her boyfriend’s college friend, Can, uses an expression meaning - “It’s the bomb.”
    Use this expression as a strong agreement.

    2- İzninle çalıyorum canım.

    Her high school friend, Seda, uses an expression meaning - “If you’ll excuse me, I’m stealing your post, dear.”
    Use this expression if you wish to share the post.

    3- Grubun adı ne?

    Her friend, Selin, uses an expression meaning - “What’s the name of the band?”
    Use this expression to get more information.

    4- Çok enerjik.

    Her neighbor, Zeynep, uses an expression meaning - “Very energetic.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • şarkı: “song”
  • bomba: “bomb”
  • çalmak: “to steal”
  • grup: “band”
  • enerjik: “energetic”
  • Which song would you share? And what would you say to a friend who posted something about sharing music or videos?

    Now you know how to start a conversation about a song or a video on social media!

    5. Turkish Social Media Comments about a Concert

    Still on the theme of music—visiting live concerts and shows just have to be shared with your friends. Here are some handy phrases and vocab to wow your followers in Turkish!

    Barış goes to a concert, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Barış’s post.

    Bu grup bir harika!
    “This band is a wonder!”

    1- Bu grup

    First is an expression meaning “This band”.
    There are six demonstratives in Turkish: Bu=This, Şu=That (nearby), O=That (over there), Bunlar=These, Şunlar=Those (nearby), and Onlar=Those (over there).

    2- bir harika

    Then comes the phrase - “is a wonder.”
    Even though “harika” is usually used as an adjective, it can also be a noun. Saying “bir harika” instead of “harika” gives the expression a touch of humor.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Barış’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ben de çok severim.

    His neighbor, Zeynep, uses an expression meaning - “I love them, too.”
    Use this expression to show you are in warm agreement.

    2- Canlı performansları çok iyidir.

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Berke, uses an expression meaning - “Their live performances are great.”
    Another expression of agreement.

    3- Yine bensiz mi eğleniyorsunuz?

    His college friend, Can, uses an expression meaning - “Are you having fun without me again?”
    Use this expression if you’re feeling excluded.

    4- Müzik ruhun gıdasıdır.

    His supervisor, Orhan, uses an expression meaning - “Music is food for the soul.”
    Use this expression to share a personal opinion in a slightly formal way.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • harika: “wonder”
  • sevmek: “to love”
  • canlı: “live”
  • eğlenmek: “to have fun”
  • ruh: “soul”
  • If a friend posted something about a concert, which phrase would you use?

    6. Talking about an Unfortunate Accident in Turkish

    Oh dear. You broke something by accident. Use these Turkish phrases to start a thread on social media. Or maybe just to let your friends know why you are not contacting them!

    Cansu accidentally breaks her mobile phone, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Cansu’s post.

    Allah kahretsin telefonumu kırdım!
    “Dang it! I broke my phone!”

    1- Allah kahretsin

    First is an expression meaning “Dang it.”
    It can also be used as “kahretsin”, which has a similar meaning to “dang it”.

    2- telefonumu kırdım

    Then comes the phrase - “I broke my phone.”
    The word “telefonum” (my phone) takes the suffix -u because it’s in the accusative case.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Cansu’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Geçmiş olsun.

    Her supervisor, Orhan, uses an expression meaning - “I hope the trouble is (already) over.”
    Use this expression to show support.

    2- Nasıl becerdin?

    Her nephew, Berke, uses an expression meaning - “How did you manage that?”
    Use this question if you wish to get more information.

    3- Takma. Olur öyle.

    Her boyfriend’s college friend, Can, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t worry. It happens.”
    Use this expression if you wish to be supportive.

    4- Üstüne bir bardak soğuk su iç.

    Her high school friend, Seda, uses an expression meaning - “Drink a glass of cold water after what happened.”
    Use this expression to give advice.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • kahretsin: “dang”
  • geçmek: “to pass, to be over”
  • becermek: “to manage, to be able to”
  • takmak: “to mind”
  • üstüne bir bardak soğuk su içmek: “to give up, to forget about the loss”
  • If a friend posted something about having broken something by accident, which phrase would you use?

    So, now you know how to describe an accident in Turkish. Well done!

    7. Chat about Your Boredom on Social Media in Turkish

    Sometimes, we’re just bored with how life goes. And to alleviate the boredom, we write about it on social media. Add some excitement to your posts by addressing your friends and followers in Turkish!

    Barış gets bored at home, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Barış’s post.

    Sıkıntıdan patlamak üzereyim.
    “I’m so bored.”

    1- sıkıntıdan patlamak

    First is an expression meaning “to explode because of boredom.”
    It’s a very common expression and a slightly childish way of saying you’re bored.

    2- üzereyim

    Then comes the phrase - “I am about to.”
    In this sentence “üzere” means “about to.” You can use this after any verb in the dictionary (-mek, -mak) form.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Barış’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ben de.

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Berke, uses an expression meaning - “Me too.”
    Use this expression to show your agreement.

    2- Kanka, gel dışarı çıkalım.

    His college friend, Can, uses an expression meaning - “Bro, let’s go out.”
    Use this expression to make plans with the poster.

    3- Aşkım, çok sıkıldıysan çamaşırları yıkasana.

    His girlfriend, Cansu, uses an expression meaning - “Darling, if you’re so bored, why don’t you do the laundry.”
    Use this expression either to tease your beloved, or perhaps you’re serious?!

    4- Kanal 2′de çok güzel bir belgesel var. Tavsiye ederim.

    His supervisor, Orhan, uses an expression meaning - “There is a very good documentary on Channel 2. I recommend that.”
    Use this expression to give advice.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • üzere: “about to”
  • de: “also”
  • kanka: “blood brother”
  • aşkım: “my love, darling”
  • belgesel: “documentary”
  • If a friend posted something about being bored, which phrase would you use?

    Still bored? Share another feeling and see if you can start a conversation!

    8. Exhausted? Share It on Social Media in Turkish

    Sitting in public transport after work, feeling like chatting online? Well, converse in Turkish about how you feel, and let your friends join in!

    Cansu feels exhausted after a long day at work, posts an image of herself looking tired, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Cansu’s post.

    Bugün işte canım çıktı. Tatile ihtiyacım var.
    “Today, I worked myself to death. I need a holiday.”

    1- Bugün işte canım çıktı.

    First is an expression meaning “Today, I worked myself to death.”
    “Can” is believed to be the life force inside a body. It is also a popular male name in Turkey. “Canı çıkmak” means “life force escaping the body”; it’s a synonym for death. Turkish people use this expression to overstate their exhaustion.

    2- Tatile ihtiyacım var.

    Then comes the phrase - “I need a holiday.”
    Turkey has more official holidays than many other countries. But compared to other OECD countries, working people in Turkey have less days off in total and work more overtime. So it’s difficult to have a vacation in Turkey unless it’s one of the official holidays.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Cansu’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Yazık sana!

    Her high school friend, Seda, uses an expression meaning - “Poor thing!”
    Use this expression to be sympathetic.

    2- Bir fincan bitki çayı iyi gelir.

    Her neighbor, Zeynep, uses an expression meaning - “A cup of herbal tea would help.”
    Use this expression to give advice.

    3- Hayat zor.

    Her nephew, Berke, uses an expression meaning - “Life is tough.”
    Use this expression to be humorous by using a philosophical statement.

    4- Bu akşam yemeği Barış hazırlıyor anlaşılan.

    Her boyfriend’s college friend, Can, uses an expression meaning - “It looks like Barış will do the cooking tonight.”
    Use this expression if you are feeling frivolous.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • can: “life force”
  • yazık: “pity”
  • fincan: “tea cup”
  • hayat: “life”
  • hazırlamak: “to prepare”
  • If a friend posted something about being exhausted, which phrase would you use?

    Now you know how to say you’re exhausted in Turkish! Well done.

    9. Talking about an Injury in Turkish

    So life happens, and you manage to hurt yourself during a soccer game. Very Tweet-worthy! Here’s how to do it in Turkish.

    Barış suffers a painful ankle injury, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Barış’s post.

    Spor salonunda bileğimi burktum. Davul gibi şişti.
    “I sprained my ankle at the gym. It’s swollen like a drum.”

    1- Spor salonunda bileğimi burktum.

    First is an expression meaning “I sprained my ankle at the gym..”
    Nowadays, going to the gym is a popular activity among white collar workers.

    2- Davul gibi şişti.

    Then comes the phrase - “It’s swollen like a drum..”
    In Turkish a drum is generally used as a comparison for swollen body parts.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Barış’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Of çok fena görünüyor.

    His neighbor, Zeynep, uses an expression meaning - “Oh, it looks very bad.”
    Use this expression if you are feeling very sympathetic.

    2- Geçmiş olsun. Doktora gittin mi?

    His supervisor, Orhan, uses an expression meaning - “Get well soon. Did you go to the doctor?”
    This is a well-wish, as well as a question. The phrases express concern.

    3- Kafam kadar olmuş.

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Seda, uses an expression meaning - “It’s almost as big as my head.”
    Use this expression to give a personal opinion about the injury.

    4- Spor salonuna gitmek kim, sen kim.

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Berke, uses an expression meaning - “Going to the gym and you are not a good match.”
    This is another personal opinion.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • bilek: “ankle, wrist”
  • fena: “bad”
  • geçmiş olsun: “get well soon”
  • kafa: “head”
  • spor salonu: “gym”
  • If a friend posted something about being injured, which phrase would you use?

    We love to share our fortunes and misfortunes; somehow that makes us feel connected to others.

    10. Starting a Conversation Feeling Disappointed in Turkish

    Sometimes things don’t go the way we planned. Share your disappointment about this with your friends!

    Cansu feels disappointed about today’s weather, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Cansu’s post.

    Pazar olmasına rağmen yağmur yüzünden evde kapalı kaldık.
    “Even though it’s Sunday, because of the rain, we’re locked up inside the house.”

    1- pazar olmasına rağmen

    First is an expression meaning “Even though it’s Sunday.”
    The first word means “Sunday,” and the third word means “even though.” In between them is the helping verb meaning “to be”.

    2- yağmur yüzünden evde kapalı kaldık

    Then comes the phrase - “because of the rain we are locked up inside the house.”
    In Turkey, winter is the rainy season, so in spring and summer weekend plans are not usually ruined because of bad weather.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Cansu’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Gerçekten çok can sıkıcı.

    Her high school friend, Seda, uses an expression meaning - “It’s really annoying.”
    Use this expression to be in agreement.

    2- Üstelik arabayı da daha geçen gün yıkatmıştım.

    Her boyfriend’s college friend, Can, uses an expression meaning - “On top of that, I just washed my car the other day.”
    Use this expression to share a personal experience. It’s a good way to keep the conversation going.

    3- Kuraklık olmasından iyidir.

    Her friend, Selin, uses an expression meaning - “It’s better than a drought.”
    Use this expression to offer a differing opinion.

    4- Bugün için bir programınız mı vardı?

    Her neighbor, Zeynep, uses an expression meaning - “Did you have plans for today?”
    Use this question to show your interest.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • yağmur: “rain”
  • can sıkıcı: “annoying”
  • araba: “car”
  • kuraklık: “drought”
  • program: “program, plan”
  • How would you comment in Turkish when a friend is disappointed?

    Not all posts need to be about a negative feeling, though!

    11. Talking about Your Relationship Status in Turkish

    Don’t just change your relationship status in Settings, talk about it!

    Barış changes his status to “In a relationship”, posts an image of him and Cansu, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Barış’s post.

    Hayatımın kadınını buldum, mutluyum.
    “I found the woman of my life. I’m happy.”

    1- Hayatımın kadınını buldum

    First is an expression meaning “I have found the woman of my life.”
    “Hayatımın kadını” is a defined compound noun meaning “the woman of my life”. In this kind of compound noun, the first noun takes the suffix -ın, and the second noun takes the third person singular possessive suffix -ı. On top of that, the noun compound takes another suffix (-nı) to form the accusative case.

    2- mutluyum

    Then comes the phrase - “I’m happy.”
    In Turkey people usually change their relationship status without making any comment, but friends and relatives rush to make comments under the post and ask questions.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Barış’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Beni yengeyle ne zaman tanıştıracaksın?

    His college friend, Can, uses an expression meaning - “When will you introduce me to her?”
    Use this question if you are curious.

    2- Ne zamandan beri?

    His friend, Selin, uses an expression meaning - “Since when?”
    Ask this question if you want more information.

    3- Bu şanslı kadın kim?

    His supervisor, Orhan, uses an expression meaning - “Who’s the lucky lady?”
    This is a slightly formal question to get more information.

    4- İnanmıyorum! Senin adına çok sevindim

    His neighbor, Zeynep, uses an expression meaning - “I don’t believe it! I’m so happy for you.”
    Use this expression if you are feeling warmhearted and pleased.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • kadın: “woman”
  • yenge: “wife of brother”
  • Ne zamandan beri?: “Since when?”
  • şanslı: “lucky”
  • sevinmek: “to rejoice”
  • What would you say in Turkish when a friend changes their relationship status?

    Being in a good relationship with someone special is good news - don’t be shy to spread it!

    12. Post about Getting Married in Turkish

    Wow, so things got serious, and you’re getting married. Congratulations! Or, your friend is getting married, so talk about this in Turkish.

    Cansu is getting married today, so she eaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Cansu’s post.

    Bugün büyük gün. Kalbim yerinden fırlayacak gibi.
    “Today’s the big day. It feels like my heart is going to pop out.”

    1- Bugün büyük gün.

    First is an expression meaning “Today is the big day..”
    “Büyük gün” is a compound adjective formed with the adjective “big” and the noun “day”.

    2- Kalbim yerinden fırlayacak gibi.

    Then comes the phrase - “It feels like my heart is going to pop out.”
    It’s an expression that shows excitement.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Cansu’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Sakın ha ağlayıp da makyajını mahvetme.

    Her high school friend, Seda, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t cry and ruin your makeup.”
    Use this expression to be funny.

    2- Canım, çok güzel bir gelin oldun.

    Her neighbor, Zeynep, uses an expression meaning - “My dear, you have become a beautiful bride.”
    Use this expression as a compliment.

    3- Damadın ayağına basmayı unutma.

    Her husband’s college friend, Can, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t forget to step on the groom’s foot.”
    Use this expression if you are feeling frivolous and are in a humorous mood.

    4- Mutluluklar dilerim.

    Her supervisor, Orhan, uses an expression meaning - “I wish you happiness.”
    This is a traditional, slightly formal well-wish.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • kalp: “heart”
  • ağlamak: “to cry”
  • gelin: “bride”
  • damat: “groom”
  • mutluluk: “happiness”
  • How would you respond in Turkish to a friend’s post about getting married?

    For the next topic, fast forward about a year into the future after the marriage…

    13. Announcing Big News in Turkish

    Wow, huge stuff is happening in your life! Announce it in Turkish.

    Barış finds out he and his wife are going to have a baby, posts an image of the two of them, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Barış’s post.

    Duyduk duymadık demeyin! Baba oluyorum!
    “Hear ye! Hear ye! I’m going to be a father!”

    1- Duyduk duymadık demeyin!

    First is an expression meaning “Do not say we have heard we have not heard!.”
    In Ottoman times, this was how public announcements started. People continue to use this expression in a humorous way.

    2- Baba oluyorum!

    Then comes the phrase - “I’m going to be a father!”
    This sentence is grammatically in the present continuous form but is referring to the future. This style of speech is often used in daily conversation.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Barış’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Oğlan olursa adını Can koyacaksın, tamam mı?

    His college friend, Can, uses an expression meaning - “If it’s a boy, you are going to name him Can, okay?”
    Use this expression to make a suggestion.

    2- Allah analı babalı büyütsün.

    His supervisor, Orhan, uses an expression meaning - “May God have the child to grow up with their parents on their side.”
    This is a formal way of blessing the child.

    3- Gözünüz aydın.

    His neighbor, Zeynep, uses an expression meaning - “Happy news for you.”
    Use this expression if you are feeling warmhearted.

    4- Tebrikler.

    His friend, Selin, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations.”
    This is the traditional response to news of this kind.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • baba: “father”
  • oğlan: “boy”
  • büyütmek: “to nurture”
  • aydın: “illuminated, intellectual”
  • tebrik: “congratulations”
  • Which phrase would you choose when a friend announces their pregnancy on social media?

    So, talking about a pregnancy will get you a lot of traction on social media. But wait till you see the responses to babies!

    14. Posting Turkish Comments about Your Baby

    Your bundle of joy is here, and you cannot keep quiet about it! Share your thoughts in Turkish.

    Cansu plays with her baby, posts an image of the cutie, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Cansu’s post.

    Banyomuzu yaptık. Keyfimiz yerinde.
    “We have taken our bath. We are in a good mood.”

    1- Banyomuzu yaptık.

    First is an expression meaning “We have taken our bath.”
    Even though only the baby has taken a bath, the mother speaks in plural. Turkish people use this style of speech when they are talking about children or people that they are responsible for.

    2- Keyfimiz yerinde.

    Then comes the phrase - “We are in a good mood.”
    Again the mother talks in plural form but means the baby is in a good mood.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Cansu’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Babaya çekmiş.

    Her nephew, Berke, uses an expression meaning - “She takes after her father.”
    Use this expression to share a personal opinion.

    2- Allah nazardan saklasın.

    Her neighbor, Zeynep, uses an expression meaning - “May God hide her from evil eyes.”
    This is a traditional wish of safety for the newcomer.

    3- Nur topu gibi maşallah.

    Her supervisor, Orhan, uses an expression meaning - “She’s like a ball of light; may God protect her.”
    Use this expression to compliment the baby, and to wish her protection.

    4- Ay ben onu yerim!

    Her high school friend, Seda, uses an expression meaning - “Aw, I will eat her up!”
    Use this expression if you think the baby is cute and adorable.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • banyo: “bath”
  • çekmek: “to take after”
  • nazar: “evil eye”
  • nur: “light”
  • yemek: “to eat”
  • If your friend is the mother or father, which phrase would you use on social media?

    Congratulations, you know the basics of chatting about a baby in Turkish! But we’re not done with families yet…

    15. Turkish Comments about a Family Reunion

    Family reunions - some you love, some you hate. Share about it on your feed.

    Barış goes to a family gathering, posts an image of the group, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Barış’s post.

    İftardan sonra babamgille tavla keyfi.
    “After iftar, I’ll enjoy a backgammon game with my father.”

    1- İftardan sonra

    First is an expression meaning “After Iftar.”
    “Iftar” is the dinner with which Muslims end their daily fasts during Ramadan. It is a tradition to prepare a family gathering and feast once or twice during Ramadan. Even the seculars in the family who don’t fast take part in the Iftar feast.

    2- babamgille tavla keyfi.

    Then comes the phrase - “I’ll enjoy a game of backgammon with my father and others.”
    Backgammon is the most popular board game in Turkey. As a tradition the winner makes the loser hold the board under his arm to show everyone who lost and who won.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Barış’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Safiye Teyze iftar sofrasında döktürmüştür yine.

    His college friend, Can, uses an expression meaning - “I’m sure Aunt Safiye did wonders for the fast breaking table.”
    Use this expression to show your appreciation.

    2- Sizinkilere selam söyle. Çok öptüm.

    His neighbor, Zeynep, uses an expression meaning - “Say hi to your folks. Many kisses.”
    Use this expression to give warmhearted, casual greetings.

    3- Allah kabul etsin.

    His supervisor, Orhan, uses an expression meaning - “May God accept your fast.”
    This is a formal, traditional saying when a sacrifice, such as a fast, was offered to God.

    4- Ne güzel bir aile!

    His friend, Selin, uses an expression meaning - “What a beautiful family!”
    Use this expression if you’re feeling appreciative.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • babamgil: “my father and the rest of the family”
  • döktürmek: “(slang) to do something with great finesse”
  • öpmek: “to kiss”
  • kabul etmek: “to accept”
  • aile: “family”
  • Which phrase is your favorite to comment on a friend’s photo about a family reunion?

    16. Post about Your Travel Plans in Turkish

    So, Cansu is going on holiday. Do you know how to post and leave comments in Turkish about being at the airport, waiting for a flight?

    Cansu waits at the airport for her flight, posts an image of herself, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Cansu’s post.

    Yolculuk zamanı. Rötar olmasa bari…
    “Time to travel. There better not be a delay.”

    1- Yolculuk zamanı.

    First is an expression meaning “Journey time”.
    With a great percentage of internal and international migration, phrases and traditions about journeys become an important part of Turkish culture. It is considered good manners to ask for details of someone’s upcoming journey and wish them a safe trip.

    2- Rötar olmasa bari…

    Then comes the phrase - “There better not be a delay..”
    “Rötar” is the term used for flight delays, something Turkish people cannot stand.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Cansu’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Yolculuk nereye?

    Her neighbor, Zeynep, uses an expression meaning - “Where to?”
    This is a traditional, expected question.

    2- Hayırlı yolculuklar.

    Her supervisor, Orhan, uses an expression meaning - “Have a good journey.”
    This is a traditional, slightly formal well-wish before someone’s journey.

    3- Tatili hak ettin.

    Her high school friend, Seda, uses an expression meaning - “You deserve a vacation.”
    Use this expression if you are supportive and warmhearted.

    4- İyi tatiller

    Her friend, Selin, uses an expression meaning - “Have a good holiday.”
    This is another well-wish, but a more casual one.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • yolculuk: “journey”
  • nereye: “to where”
  • hayırlı: “auspicious”
  • hak etmek: “to deserve”
  • tatil: “vacation”
  • Choose and memorize your best airport phrase in Turkish!

    Hopefully the rest of the trip is better!

    17. Posting about an Interesting Find in Turkish

    So maybe you’re strolling around at a local market, and find something interesting. Here are some handy Turkish phrases!

    Barış finds an unusual item at a local market, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Barış’s post.

    Bakın pazarda ne buldum - yaprak sarma makinesi! Asma yaprağı ve pirinci koyuyorsunuz, bir saniyede sarmanız hazır.
    “Look what I found in the bazaar - a leaf rolling machine! You put in vine leaves and rice and your sarma is ready in a second.”

    1- Bakın pazarda ne buldum: yaprak sarma makinesi!

    First is an expression meaning “Look what I found in the bazaar - a leaf rolling machine!.”
    Bazaars are very important in Turkey. Every neighborhood holds a bazaar once a week. You can find the freshest fruits and vegetables for the lowest prices. Some housewives in poorer families buy a week’s share of fruits and vegetables. You can also find cheap clothes, accessories, and household gadgets.

    2- Asma yaprağı ve pirinci koyuyorsunuz, bir saniyede sarmanız hazır

    Then comes the phrase - “You put vine leaves and rice and your sarma is ready in a second..”
    Sarma, which is a rice stuffed vine leaf roll, is one of the most popular but time consuming dishes in Turkish cuisine. Vine leaf rolling gadgets, which work in the same way as cigarette rolling gadgets, used to be a big hit in the bazaars.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Barış’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Madem öyle, bundan sonra sarmalar senden.

    His wife, Cansu, uses an expression meaning - “If that’s the case, from now on you will be cooking the sarma.”
    Use this expression to tease the poster a bit.

    2- Pişirip bir tabak getirirsin artık.

    His college friend, Can, uses an expression meaning - “You better cook and bring me a plate, too.”
    Use this expression if you are feeling eager and frivolous.

    3- Harika bir icat!

    His neighbor, Zeynep, uses an expression meaning - “A great invention!”
    Use this expression if you are in agreement.

    4- Bayıldım!

    His friend, Selin, uses an expression meaning - “I love it!”
    Use this expression if you are feeling very optimistic.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • pazar: “bazaar”
  • sarma: “rolling, stuffed leaf rolls”
  • pişirmek: “to cook”
  • icat: “invention”
  • bayılmak: “to pass out, to like very much”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s interesting find?

    Perhaps you will even learn the identity of your find! Or perhaps you’re on holiday, and visiting interesting places…

    18. Post about a Sightseeing Trip in Turkish

    Let your friends know what you’re up to in Turkish, especially when visiting a remarkable place! Don’t forget the photo.

    Cansu visits a famous landmark, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Cansu’s post.

    İstanbul’a bahar geldi. Bugün Ortaköy’ü geziyorum.
    “Spring has arrived in Istanbul. Today, I’m sightseeing in Ortaköy.”

    1- İstanbul’a bahar geldi.

    First is an expression meaning “Spring has arrived in Istanbul..”
    Spring in Istanbul is associated with blooming Judas trees and tulips.

    2- Bugün Ortaköy’ü geziyorum.

    Then comes the phrase - “Today, I’m sightseeing in Ortaköy..”
    Locals visit Ortaköy to enjoy a view of the sea, the huge Bosphorus bridge, and the elegant Ortaköy Mosque.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Cansu’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Öyleyse Arnavutköy’e de uğramalısın.

    Her neighbor, Zeynep, uses an expression meaning - “Then you should stop by Arnavutköy, too.”
    Use this expression to make a suggestion.

    2- Hayat sana güzel.

    Her high school friend, Seda, uses an expression meaning - “Life is good for you.”
    Use this expression to share a personal opinion.

    3- İyi eğlenceler.

    Her friend, Selin, uses an expression meaning - “Have fun.”
    Use this expression as a casual well-wish.

    4- Keyifli gezmeler Cansu hanım.

    Her supervisor, Orhan, uses an expression meaning - “I wish you a pleasant sightseeing, Ms. Cansu.”
    This is a formal well-wish.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • gezmek: “to travel, to sightsee”
  • uğramak: “to stop by, to pass by”
  • güzel: “beautiful, nice”
  • eğlence: “fun, entertainment”
  • hanım: “lady”
  • Which phrase would you prefer when a friend posts about a famous landmark?

    Share your special places with the world. Or simply post about your relaxing experiences.

    19. Post about Relaxing Somewhere in Turkish

    So you’re doing nothing yet you enjoy that too? Tell your social media friends about it in Turkish!

    Barış relaxes at a beautiful place, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Barış’s post.

    Büyükada’da haftasonu kaçamağı.
    “A weekend getaway in Buyukada.”

    1- Büyükada’da

    First is an expression meaning “in Buyukada.”
    Buyukada, or Big Island, is the biggest of the Prince islands in Istanbul. These islands are easy to access with a ferry ride and are a popular day-trip destination during summer.

    2- haftasonu kaçamağı

    Then comes the phrase - “a weekend getaway.”
    White collar workers in Turkey use this expression often when they go on a trip away from the city center.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Barış’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Sizi kaçaklar sizi!

    His wife’s high school friend, Seda, uses an expression meaning - “You runaways!”
    Use this expression to be funny.

    2- Keyifli haftasonları Barış Bey.

    His supervisor, Orhan, uses an expression meaning - “Wish you a delightful weekend, Mr. Barış.”
    This is a formal well-wish.

    3- Bu mevsimde Adalar çok güzeldir.

    His neighbor, Zeynep, uses an expression meaning - “The Islands must be lovely this season.”
    Use this expression to share a personal opinion.

    4- Güzel havanın tadını çıkarın.

    His friend, Selin, uses an expression meaning - “Enjoy the nice weather.”
    Use this expression if you are feeling optimistic and wish the poster well.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • haftasonu: “weekend”
  • kaçak: “runaway”
  • bey: “sir, mister”
  • mevsim: “season”
  • hava: “weather”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s feed?

    The break was great, but now it’s time to return home.

    20. What to Say in Turkish When You’re Home Again

    And you’re back! What will you share with friends and followers?

    Cansu returns home after a vacation, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Cansu’s post.

    Evim evim güzel evim. Ama keşke tatil hiç bitmeseydi diyorum.
    “Home sweet home. But I wish the vacation never ended.”

    1- Evim evim güzel evim.

    First is an expression meaning “Home sweet home.”
    Note that in the translation of the famous phrase “home sweet home” Turkish people say “my home” twice at the beginning to enhance the meaning.

    2- Ama keşke tatil hiç bitmeseydi diyorum.

    Then comes the phrase - “But I wish the vacation never ended.”
    On Turkish social media you can see a lot of people complaining about Monday syndrome or post-vacation syndrome.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Cansu’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Her güzel şeyin bir sonu vardır.

    Her high school friend, Seda, uses an expression meaning - “Every good thing has an end.”
    Use this expression to share a personal opinion.

    2- Tatil sonrası sendromuna hoşgeldin.

    Her husband’s college friend, Can, uses an expression meaning - “Welcome to post-vacation syndrome.”
    Use this expression to show your agreement.

    3- Yarın işbaşı mı yapıyorsun?

    Her neighbor, Zeynep, uses an expression meaning - “Are you going back to work tomorrow?”
    Ask this question if you want information.

    4- Yalnız iyi tatil yaptın.

    Her nephew, Berke, uses an expression meaning - “But you took a good vacation.”
    Use this expression to share a personal opinion.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • keşke: “if only”
  • son: “end”
  • sendrom: “syndrome”
  • işbaşı yapmak: “to start working”
  • tatil yapmak: “to take a vacation”
  • How would you welcome a friend back from a trip?

    What do you post on social media during a religious holiday such as Ruz-ı Hızır (day of Hızır)?

    21. It’s Time to Celebrate in Turkish

    It’s an historic day and you wish to post something about it on social media. What would you say?

    Barış partakes in Ruz-i Hizir celebrations, posts an image of this, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Barış’s post.

    Sahilde Hıdrellez kutlaması. Üzerinden atladığım ateş 2 metre vardı!
    “Hıdrellez celebration on the shore. The fire I jumped over was almost 2 meters tall!”

    1- Sahilde Hıdrellez kutlaması.

    First is an expression meaning “Hıdrellez celebration on the shore.”
    It is believed that the prophets Hızır and Elijah meet on earth every year on the 5th of May. On that night people write down or draw their wishes and put them under rose trees.

    2- Üzerinden atladığım ateş 2 metre vardı!

    Then comes the phrase - “The fire I jumped over was almost 2 meters tall..”
    Another ritual on that night is to jump over fire.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Barış’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ateşten atlarken paçaların tutuşmasın da.

    His high school friend of Cansu, Seda, uses an expression meaning - “Make sure your pants don’t catch fire while jumping.”
    Use this expression to be funny.

    2- 2 metre mi?! Tabii tabii öyledir.

    His college friend, Can, uses an expression meaning - “2 meters?! Yeah, sure.”
    Use this expression if you are feeling incredulous.

    3- Ben de dileklerimi gül ağacına astım.

    His neighbor, Zeynep, uses an expression meaning - “I tied my wishes on a rose tree.”
    Use this expression to share personal news.

    4- Bugünün Hıdrellez olduğunu unutmuşum. Hemen bir gül ağacı bulmalıyım!

    His friend, Selin, uses an expression meaning - “I forgot today was Hıdrellez. I have to find a rose tree right away!”
    Another bit of personal news - always a good way to keep a thread alive.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • ateş: “fire”
  • atlamak: “to jump”
  • metre: “meter”
  • dilek: “wish”
  • gül ağacı: “rose tree”
  • If a friend posted something about a holiday, which phrase would you use?

    But, the Day of Hızır and other public commemoration days are not the only special ones to remember!

    22. Posting about a Birthday on Social Media in Turkish

    Your friend or you are celebrating your birthday in an unexpected way. Be sure to share this on social media!

    Cansu goes to her birthday party, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Cansu’s post.

    İş yerinden arkadaşlar benim için sürpriz doğum günü partisi hazırlamış!
    “Friends from the workplace have prepared a surprise birthday party for me!”

    1- İş yerinden arkadaşlar

    First is an expression meaning “friends from the workplace.”
    Colleagues are called friends from work even though they are not real friends.

    2- benim için sürpriz doğum günü partisi hazırlamış.

    Then comes the phrase - “have prepared a surprise birthday party for me.”
    In Turkish when the subject of a sentence is human and plural, the verb should also be plural. But in some sentences, like this one, if the subject is in third person plural and they are doing the action together as a group, the verb can be in third person singular form.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Cansu’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Asıl parti ne zaman?

    Her husband’s college friend, Can, uses an expression meaning - “When is the real party?”
    Use this expression if you are feeling frivolous.

    2- Doğum günün kutlu olsun.

    Her neighbor, Zeynep, uses an expression meaning - “Happy birthday.”
    This is a traditional birthday wish.

    3- Nice yıllara.

    Her friend, Selin, uses an expression meaning - “To many more years.”
    This is a casual birthday wish, wishing the poster a long life.

    4- Kaç oldun?

    Her nephew, Berke, uses an expression meaning - “What age are you now?”
    Ask this question if you wish to know more details.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • iş yeri: “work place”
  • parti: “party”
  • doğum günü: “birthday”
  • yıl: “year”
  • kaç: “how much, how many”
  • If a friend posted something about birthday greetings, which phrase would you use?

    23. Talking about New Year on Social Media in Turkish

    Impress your friends with your Turkish New Year’s wishes this year. Learn the phrases easily!

    Barış celebrates the New Year, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Barış’s post.

    Yeni yıl herkese sağlık, mutluluk ve başarı getirsin.
    “The new year shall bring health, happiness, and success to everyone.”

    1- Yeni yıl

    First is an expression meaning “The new year.”
    In Turkey while young people go out to party on the night of December 31, families with children stay at home and play bingo or other board games while they wait for the belly dance show on TV. Watching belly dancers on TV became a New Year’s tradition in 1981 when the state television channel let a belly dancer dance on TV for the first time.

    2- herkese sağlık, mutluluk ve başarı getirsin.

    Then comes the phrase - “shall bring health, happiness, and success to everyone.”
    Thinking of long and fancy new year’s wishes and sending them to everyone via text message or email is very common in Turkey.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Barış’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Amin!

    His high school friend of Cansu, Seda, uses an expression meaning - “Amen!”
    Use this phrase to empathically express agreement.

    2- Hayırlı seneler

    His supervisor, Orhan, uses an expression meaning - “Auspicious new year.”
    This is a slightly formal New Year’s wish.

    3- Mutlu, sağlıklı, huzurlu yıllar.

    His neighbor, Zeynep, uses an expression meaning - “Happy, healthy, peaceful years.”
    This is a slightly more original, personal New Year’s wish.

    4- Yeni yılınız kutlu olsun.

    His friend, Selin, uses an expression meaning - “Happy New Year.”
    This is a traditional response to a New Year’s wish.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • Yeni yıl: “New year”
  • amin: “amen”
  • sene: “year”
  • sağlıklı: “healthy”
  • kutlu: “blessed”
  • Which is your favorite phrase to post on social media during New Year?

    But before New Year’s Day comes another important day…

    24. What to Post on Ramadan in Turkish

    What will you say in Turkish about Ramadan?

    Cansu celebrates Ramadan with her family, posts an image of the group, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Cansu’s post.

    Anneannemlerde bayram yemeği.
    “Holiday meal at my grandmother’s.”

    1- Anneannemlerde

    First is an expression meaning “at my grandmother’s.”
    The first word is the plural form of the word for maternal grandmother. It means “at the home of my mother’s mother and the rest of her family”.

    2- bayram yemeği

    Then comes the phrase - “holiday meal.”
    Holiday meal could be a lunch or an early dinner.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Cansu’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Hayırlı bayramlar.

    Her supervisor, Orhan, uses an expression meaning - “Auspicious holidays.”
    This expression is a formal well-wish for the holidays.

    2- Büyüklerin ellerinden, küçüklerin gözlerinden öperim. Şeker bayramınız kutlu olsun.

    Her neighbor, Zeynep, uses an expression meaning - “I kiss the elder’s hands and younger’s eyes. Happy Candy Holiday.”
    Use this expression if you are feeling warmhearted respect for the elders in the family.

    3- Bayramda akraba ziyaretinden kaçış yok.

    Her nephew, Berke, uses an expression meaning - “There is no escape from visiting relatives on holidays.”
    Use this phrase to express humor by being a bit cynical.

    4- Ramazan bayramınız kutlu olsun.

    Her friend, Selin, uses an expression meaning - “Happy Ramadan.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • anneanne: “grandmother on mother’s side”
  • bayram: “religious or national holiday”
  • el: “hand”
  • akraba: “relative”
  • Ramazan bayramı: “Ramadan Holiday”
  • If a friend posted something about Ramadan greetings, which phrase would you use?

    So, the festive season is over! Yet, there will always be other days, besides a birthday, to wish someone well.

    25. Post about Your Anniversary in Turkish

    Some things deserve to be celebrated, like wedding anniversaries. Learn which Turkish phrases are meaningful and best suited for this purpose!

    Barış celebrates his wedding anniversary with his wife, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Barış’s post.

    Birtanemle 2. evlilik yıldönümümüzü kutluyoruz..
    “Celebrating our 2nd wedding anniversary with my only one…”

    1- Birtanemle.

    First is an expression meaning “with my only one…”
    There are many words of endearment in Turkish and Turkish people use these very often. There are many couples in Turkey that never call each other by their actual names. But they always use words of endearment, even when they are having an argument.

    2- 2. evlilik yıldönümümüzü kutluyoruz

    Then comes the phrase - “Celebrating our 2nd wedding anniversary.”
    In Turkish, counters are written with a dot after the number.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Barış’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ay çok şekersiniz!

    His neighbor, Zeynep, uses an expression meaning - “Aw, you are lovely!”
    Use this expression to show your appreciation.

    2- İnsan Boğaz’da bir yemeğe götürür.

    His wife’s nephew, Berke, uses an expression meaning - “A decent human would take her for dinner in Bosphorus.”
    Use this phrase to show humor by being a bit insulting.

    3- Birlikte nice mutlu senelere

    His friend, Selin, uses an expression meaning - “I wish you many more happy years together.”
    This is a warm well-wish to the couple.

    4- Evlilik yıldönümünüz kutlu olsun.

    His supervisor, Orhan, uses an expression meaning - “Happy wedding anniversary.”
    This wish is more traditional and old fashioned, but still universally used.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • evlilik: “marriage”
  • şeker: “sweet, lovely”
  • Boğaz: “Bosphorus”
  • birlikte: “together”
  • yıldönümü: “anniversary”
  • If a friend posted something about Anniversary greetings, which phrase would you use?

    Conclusion

    Learning to speak a new language will always be easier once you know key phrases that everybody uses. These would include commonly used expressions for congratulations and best wishes, etc.

    Master these in fun ways with Learn Turkish! We offer a variety of tools to individualize your learning experience, including using cell phone apps, audiobooks, iBooks and many more. Never wonder again what to say on social media!

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    How to Say Sorry in Turkish

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    Learn how to apologize in Turkish - fast and accurately! TurkishClass101 makes it easy for you to make amends. Start with a bonus, and download your FREE cheat sheet - How to Improve Your Turkish Skills! (Logged-In Member Only)

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    Table of Contents

    1. Common Ways to Say Sorry in Turkish
    2. How To Refuse Something Politely in Turkish
    3. Audio Lesson - Survival Phrases “How to Say Sorry”
    4. Why You Will NOT Be Sorry For Learning Turkish through TurkishClass101


    1. Common Ways to Say Sorry in Turkish

    3 Ways to Say Sorry

    Nobody’s perfect, not anywhere in the world. Everybody makes mistakes, and does and says regrettable things. Then it’s time to apologize, as saying ‘I’m sorry’ is not in vain. It can be very healing! Did you know that hearing a sincerely-meant apology can have a noticeable effect on a person’s body? Research has shown that it slows down breathing and heart rate, and even causes a drop in blood pressure.

    Sometimes we cannot fix what’s broken, but we can make the experience a bit easier for anyone who suffered on account of our thoughtless actions or words.

    Here are a number of ways to say sorry in Turkish. In any language, just make sure you really mean it! An insincere apology will not go down well with anyone.

    Woman Apologizing

    Özür dilerim.
    I’m sorry

    These words should precede anything else you have to say. Use them sincerely and whenever you are clearly in the wrong. Acknowledging your guilt and apologizing for any wrongdoing will lift your spirits too! Often, remorse can eat away at us, and a simple ‘I’m sorry’, in Turkish or any other language, can open the door for forgiveness and resolution of a bad situation. It can be a true gift!

    Özür dilemek isterim.
    I would like to apologize.

    This is a slightly more formal way to say ‘I’m sorry’ in Turkish. Use this phrase if you’re addressing your superiors and/or elders.

    Tüm samimiyetimle özür dilerim.
    I sincerely apologize.

    If you feel strongly about your apology, this is another slightly more formal phrase to use. Keep it handy for graver errors, or you might come across as insincere!

    Tekrar yapmayacağım.
    I won’t do it again.

    A promise you can only make if you intend to keep it! Few things feel as bad as having to hear repeated apologies from someone for the same behavior - it means the ‘sorry’ is not sincere. Don’t be that person!

    Bu hatayı tekrar yapmamaya dikkat edeceğim.
    I’ll make sure not to make this mistake again.

    A beautifully strong phrase! Again, say this only if you mean it - not just in the moment, but always! A bit more formal, this is an especially good phrase to use when apologizing to superiors and/or elders. It will make an especially good impression at the workplace, where accountability is an excellent quality to display!

    Onu demek istemedim.
    I didn’t mean that.

    This is a tricky one… What did you mean, then?! Clear up any confusion with sincerity. Also, use this phrase only if the harm done or mistake made was due to an accident, and then admit to thoughtlessness on your part, if appropriate.

    Bu benim hatam.
    It’s my fault.

    If the fault is really yours, own up to it. You will gain respect in the eyes of others! However, don’t take the blame when it’s not truly yours. It won’t be good for you, and ultimately you will not be respected much for it.

    Bencillik yaptığım için üzgünüm.
    I’m sorry for being selfish.

    This is a good phrase to keep handy, especially for your close relationships. It is difficult to admit you’re selfish, isn’t it?! However, it’s good to know when to be honest. We get used to our loved ones, which often means we forget that they need our good manners and unselfish behavior just as much as strangers do.

    Umarım beni affedersin.
    I hope you will forgive me.

    This is a polite and gentle wish that can smooth over many harsh feelings. It also shows that the other person’s opinion and forgiveness are important to you.

    Tüm sorumluluğu üstüme alıyorum.
    I take full responsibility.

    This strong statement is similar to admitting that an error or transgression was your fault. It speaks of courage and the willingness to take remedial action. Good one to use…if you mean it!

    Bunu yapmamalıydım.
    I shouldn’t have done it.

    This phrase is fine to use if you did or said something wrong. It shows, to an extent, your regret for having done or said what you did, and demonstrates that you understand your role in the mistake.

    Paranızı geç geri verdiğim için özür dilerim.
    Sorry for giving your money back late.

    It’s rotten to have to loan money! Yet, it’s equally rotten to have to ask for the repayment of a loan. So, do your best not to pay late in the first place, but if it can’t be helped, this would be a good phrase to use!

    Lütfen bana kızma.
    Please don’t be mad at me.

    Well, this is not a very advisable phrase to use if you are clearly in the wrong. If someone is justifiably angry with you, asking them not to be mad at you would be an unfair expectation. However, if you did something wrong by accident, and if the consequences were not too serious, this request would be OK.

    Üzgünüm geciktim.
    Sorry I’m late.

    Punctuality is valued in most situations, but if you really cannot help being late, then apologize! This way you show respect for your host, and win their approval.

    Sana kötü davrandığım için özür dilerim.
    I apologize for being mean to you.

    Acknowledging your own meanness towards someone is no small thing, so good for you! Use this apology only if your intention is to seriously address your mean tendencies, or these words could become meaningless over time.


    2. How To Refuse Something Politely in Turkish

    Woman Refusing

    Congratulations! Now you know how to apologize in Turkish! After you have apologized for a mistake, focus on fixing whatever you can, and don’t punish yourself over something that cannot be taken back or reversed. That’s healthy for you! Regret can eat away at the soul, and even destroy it. It is ultimately a useless emotion if it consumes you.

    However, in language, we use apologies not only when we’ve transgressed or made mistakes. They come in handy in other situations too, when there has been no wrongdoing. Sometimes we need to express regret for having to refuse a gift, an offer, or an invitation. This can be somewhat tricky. Learn from specialists at TurkishClass101 about how to use the correct Turkish words for this kind of ‘sorry’!


    3. Survival Phrases “How to Say Sorry”

    Say Sorry

    On the run and need a quick lesson on how to say sorry in Turkish? Don’t fret, just listen and repeat! Click here for a recorded short lesson and learn how to give the perfect apology, with perfect pronunciation in Turkish. A little can go a long way, and you will sound like a native!


    4. Why You Will NOT Be Sorry For Learning Turkish through TurkishClass101

    Man Looking at Computer

    Online learning is here to stay, that’s a fact. In 2015, the Digital Learning Compass Partnership released a report based on surveys to determine online enrollment trends in US institutions for higher education. Thirty percent of all their students learned online! And the number is growing! However, how can you be sure you will not regret your choice of an online language learning school? First, look at the school’s credentials and what it has to offer…

    • Fun and Easy Learning: It’s a commonly-known fact that when learning is made easy and fun, student motivation rises. And as motivation rises, so does the effort to learn - what a beautiful cycle! TurkishClass101’s language learning system is designed to get you speaking from the onset. Learn at your own convenience and pace with our short, effective and fun audio podcast lessons. Our Learning Center is comprehensive and state-of-the-art, with a vibrant user community to connect to! Our lessons are recorded with native hosts and voice actors, providing a diverse range of dialects in your lessons. You can be confident that native speakers will understand you when speaking Turkish!
    • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
    • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Turkish with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account - for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Turkish dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about TurkishClass101…!
    • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters, as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. Your can have your very own Turkish teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to - what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
    • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Turkish word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Turkish level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

    After this lesson, you will know almost every ‘sorry for’ in Turkish, but don’t let it be that you’re sorry for missing a great opportunity. Learning a new language can only enrich your life, and could even open doors towards great opportunities! So don’t wonder if you’ll regret enrolling in TurkishClass101. It’s the most fun, easy way to learn Turkish!

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    A New Language: Turkish Slang for Texting and the Web

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    Have you ever heard of “Turkish bird language?” If you have, please note that I’m not talking about Turkish whistling language, which farmers use. When I was a kid, my friends and I used to talk in a bird language, putting “ge, ga, gi, gu, gö, gü” after each syllable. It wouldn’t have sounded like Turkish to a foreigner learning the language.

    Nowadays, Turkish slang for the internet is very popular. And guess what? When you read these words and expressions, you might think they don’t sound like Turkish either. They remind me of the good old days! You need to know about these slang words and abbreviations to figure out this new language!

    Let’s start with regular Turkish slang words and then continue with internet and text slang.

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    Table of Contents

    1. What is Slang?
    2. Turkish Internet/Text Slang
    3. Sample Turkish Internet Slang Phrases
    4. Go Beyond Turkish Slang


    1. What is Slang?

    Computer Words

    Essentially, slang is a more informal and playful way of using a given language. It’s often very different from how people usually speak or write in that language.

    1- Why is it used?

    People, especially the young generation, use slang a lot because they think:

    • It’s fun and witty.
    • It’s friendlier.
    • It expresses nuances better than formal language.
    • It communicates more quickly.
    • Parents and others won’t understand what they’re talking about.
    • It’s understood within a certain group.
    • It shows that they belong to a certain group.

    2- What is internet or text slang?

    These days, nearly everyone has a smartphone, so the internet, social media usage, and text messaging are very popular. They became the most common channels for chatting.

    Young people use abbreviations, acronyms, and slang words when chatting. By using these special characters, they type faster and save time. Even though the older people think it’s nonsense, younger people think it’s cool!

    People of many different disciplines have been studying and discussing internet and text slang as a social topic. Some psychologists think it leads to a lazier generation who will look for shortcuts in other areas of their lives. Linguists think it’s unnecessary and it ruins languages.

    3- How is internet or text slang different?

    Internet and text slang and the slang we use in daily life are alike in the sense that they may both include swear words. However, internet and text slang consists of abbreviations, acronyms, symbols, and characters not usually found in the spoken word.


    2. Turkish Internet/Text Slang

    Computer Sentences

    Everything we discussed above also relates to Turkish slang. In this article, I will talk about Turkish internet words and Turkish text slang words, and will provide translations for you. Daily slang in Turkish will be covered in another article, and for the purpose of this article, I won’t mention Turkish internet slang swear words, either. (You can refer to Wikibooks if you’re curious about this topic.)

    Turkish internet slang phrases include:

    • Slang words
    • Abbreviations and acronyms
    • Characters that stand for emotions/emoticons

    Slang Words

    Some Turkish slang words are also used in Turkish internet slang phrases and as Turkish text slang words. Here are some examples:

    • Bro:
      • This is the short form of the word “brother” in English. It’s used as “friend.”
    • Mal:
      • This word in Turkish means “goods” or “estate.” However, in slang, it means “stupid” or “idiot.”
    • Cool:
      • This Turkish slang term comes from English. It’s used with its original English meaning.
    • Efso:
      • This is the short form of the word efsane in Turkish. It means “legend.”
    • Popi:
      • This word is used for the word popüler in Turkish, which means “popular” in English.
    • Ponçik:
      • This is a word that doesn’t exist in Turkish. Boys and girls call each other ponçik, which basically means “nice” or “cute.”
    • Sayko:
      • When the word “psycho” in English is pronounced, it’s written as sayko in Turkish. It’s used with the same meaning in English.
    • Ciciş:
      • This refers to somebody who is “nice and sweet.”
    • Kanka / Kanks / Kanki / Panpa:
      • All of these words are used to say “buddy.”
    • Kıro / Kro:
      • Both of these words mean “yokel.”
    • Cringe:
      • This is used to express embarrassment on behalf of somebody else.
    • Challenge yapmak:
      • This Turkish texting slang means “to call out.”
    • Like atmak:
      • This one is used to express the act of liking something on Facebook.
    • Sahiplemek:
      • This means that two people are compatible with each other.
    • Trip atmak:
      • This means “to attitudinize.”
    • Trollemek:
      • This one means “to create trouble.”
    • Keklemek:
      • This word is “to deceive.”
    • İfşalamak:
      • This one means “to reveal.”
    • Abrvtns and Acrnyms:
      • This means “abbreviations” and “acronyms.”

    Now, here comes the fun part, if you like to solve puzzles!

    Abbreviation Puzzle

    Usually, three-letter abbreviations are used to shorten words. In most cases, vowels are omitted and sometimes acronyms are used.

    Refer to the table of abbreviated Turkish slang expressions below to see the commonly used abbreviations and acronyms when texting. If you’d like to test yourself, you can easily close the second column!

    Abbreviation/Acronym Turkish English
    Slm Selam Hi
    Mrb Merhaba Hello
    Nbr Ne haber? What’s up?
    Nslsn Nasılsın? How are you?
    Nrd Neredesin? Where are you?
    Nzmn Ne zaman? When?
    Tmm / Tm / Ok / Okey / Oki Tamam OK
    Tbr Tebrikler. Congratulations.
    Tşk Teşekkürler. Thank you.
    Kib Kendine iyi bak. Take care.
    Grşz Görüşürüz. See you.
    Hg Hayırlı günler. Have a good day.
    Inş İnşallah Hopefully
    Muck / Mck / Mujk Öpüyorum. Kisses
    Ss Seni seviyorum. I love you.
    Sçs Seni çok seviyorum. I love you very much.
    Ajkm / Aşkm Aşkım My love
    Cnm Canım My soul
    Tnşlm Tanışalım. Let’s get to know each other.
    Abv Allah belanı versin. God damn you.
    Aeo Allaha emanet ol. Literal translation: Be entrusted to God. (Used when saying bye)
    Bgn Bugün Today
    Yrn Yarın Tomorrow
    E Evet Yes
    H Hayır No
    Dm Usually, this is the abbreviation used by those who want to send/receive private messages. Direct message
    By / Bb Güle güle Bye / Bye bye
    Knk Kanka / Dostum Buddy / My friend
    Ayn Aynen Exactly
    Mük Mükemmel Perfect
    Arv Allah rahatlık versin Literal translation: Hope God gives comfort.

    It’s used when someone is going to sleep, sort of like “Goodnight, have a nice sleep.”

    Gt Geri takip Follow back
    Kt Karşılıklı takip Follow mutually

    I wonder how well you did guessing the shortened words!

    Internet Slang

    Some Turkish people, especially those who speak English, might also use the following acronyms that are commonly used in English:

    • LOL: Laugh out loud
    • Bff: Best friends forever
    • Np: No problem
    • OMG: Oh my God!
    • Thx: Thanks

    Characters That Stand for Emoticons

    There are so many emoticons/emojis that can be used these days. However, in the past, we used to use some characters that stood for emotions. Some people still use them, especially those who are middle-aged.

    Happy and Unhappy Faces

    Here are the most frequently used ones:

    : ) or : -) Smiley or happy face
    :))) or :)) Very happy
    : ( or :-( Unhappy
    :D Laughing
    ; ) or ;‑) Wink
    :P Tongue sticking out
    @}->– or @}‑;‑’‑‑‑ or @>‑‑>‑‑ Rose
    Heart


    3. Sample Turkish Internet Slang Phrases

    Texting Slang

    Let’s look at some Turkish slang phrases in action and have a little more fun. :)

    Person Text message Proper Turkish English
    1 mrb aşkm :) nslsn? Merhaba aşkım, nasılsın? Hello my love, how are you?
    2 iim, sen? İyiyim, ya sen? I’m fine and you?
    1 İi, tşk İyiyim teşekkürler. I’m fine, thanks.
    2 nzmn gidiosun? Ne zaman gidiyorsun? When are you going?
    1 yrn Yarın Tomorrow.
    2 Özlicem. kib Özleyeceğim. Kendine iyi bak. I’ll miss you. Take care.
    1 Sen de. sçs Sen de. Seni çok seviyorum. You, too. I love you very much.
    2 Sçs, muck Seni çok seviyorum. Öpüyorum. I love you very much. Kisses.
    1 muck Öpüyorum. Kisses.

    Wow, did you count how many words they saved when texting? It’s incredible!

    Texting Is Fun!

    I don’t use a lot of abbreviations when I’m texting. Therefore, it’s a little difficult for me to create different examples. Here’s another one that I got from this website:

    Person Text message Proper Turkish English
    1 Nbr knk? Knsr vr glcn mi? st 23:30 da Ne haber, kanka? Konser var, gelecek misin? Saat 23:30’da. What’s up, buddy? There is a concert. Will you come? It’s at 23:30.
    2 Nrd knk? Where is it, kanka? Where is it, buddy?
    3 Stdyumda Stadyumda. It’s at the stadium.
    4 Oki. glcm Tamam. Gelicem. OK. I will come.

    You can click here to see more examples.


    4. Go Beyond Turkish Slang

    I’m sure this article will prevent you from falling behind in understanding Turkish internet slang phrases and Turkish text slang words in your daily life. However, please don’t forget that you’ll need proper Turkish, especially at work, school, or in formal meetings or gatherings. Turkish internet words won’t help you much when you need to communicate in formal Turkish.

    TurkishClass101 will help you build a strong grammar infrastructure and improve your vocabulary. We have tons of vocabulary lists with audio recordings, and free resources including a dictionary you can easily refer to.

    You can also download the app for free and use it wherever you are.

    Don’t forget that there’s also MyTeacher, which is a Premium PLUS service of TurkishClass101 that you can use to practice with a private teacher.

    As usual, we can’t wait to hear your feedback about your experience with the services offered at TurkishClass101!

    Before you go, let us know in the comments what the most popular slang words and phrases are in your own language. We’re curious!

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