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Lesson Transcript

Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 8 - Where Did You Buy Those Beautiful Turkish Earrings?
INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to TurkishClass101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 8 - Where Did You Buy Those Beautiful Turkish Earrings? Eric here.
İçten: Merhaba, I'm İçten.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn time clauses, like “after,” “before,” and “until.” The conversation takes place on the street.
İçten: It's between Özge and Selin.
Eric: The speakers are friends, so they’ll use informal Turkish. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Özge: Küpelerin çok güzel. Nereden aldın?
Selin: Teşekkür ederim. Bağdat Caddesi’nde bir butikten aldım.
Özge: Yerini tarif etsene. Ben oraları pek bilmiyorum.
Selin: 100 metre ilerideki ışıklardan sola dön. Karşıya geç. Köşedeki restorandan sonra sarı dolmuşların kalktığı durağı göreceksin.
Özge: Ne zaman geliyor?
Selin: Zamanı yok. Dolunca kalkar. Sahil dolmuşlarına bin. O dolmuşlar Anadolu yakasına gider. Caddebostan'da ineceksin. Süpermarketten hemen önce sola dön. Orada dar bir sokak var.
Selin: Sağında postaneyi geçinceye kadar yürü, sağa dön, hemen karşında.
Özge: Hmm biraz kafam karıştı.
Selin: (laughs) Tamam. Haftaya beraber gideriz.
Eric: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Ozge: Your earrings are beautiful. Where did you get them?
Selin: Thank you. I bought them from a boutique on Baghdad Street.
Ozge: Can you describe where it is? I'm not familiar with that neighborhood.
Selin: Walk a hundred meters and turn left. Cross the street. After the restaurant at the corner you'll see the yellow jitney stop.
Ozge: What are their hours?
Selin: Well, they don't operate on a schedule. They leave when the jitney is full. Take sahil jitneys. They go to the Anatolian side. Get off at Caddebostan. Turn left just before the supermarket and you'll see a narrow street.
Selin: Walk until you pass the post office to your right, turn right, and it's right across from there.
Ozge: Well, I'm a little confused.
Selin: (laughs) OK. Next week, we'll go together.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: In this lesson, it seemed that we were getting lost.
İçten: Yes, poor Özge was getting very confused!
Eric: How do you travel around İstanbul?
İçten: You can travel easily on the intercity buses. If you want to travel around the country, you can go via the Harem Bus Terminal in Istanbul.
Eric: Do people often fly domestically?
İçten: Yeah, there are a few budget airlines that operate domestic flights. Try Turkish Airlines, Onur Air, Atlasjet, or Pegasus Airlines.
Eric: The webpages for those airlines are in the lesson notes.
İçten: There are two airports in İstanbul; Atatürk and Sabiha Gökçen.
Eric: Are these airports easily reachable?
İçten: You can reach them via a private bus company called Havaş, or public transportation.
Eric: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
İçten: küpe [natural native speed]
Eric: earring
İçten: küpe[slowly - broken down by syllable]
İçten: küpe [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
İçten: butik [natural native speed]
Eric: boutique
İçten: butik[slowly - broken down by syllable]
İçten: butik [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
İçten: dolmuş [natural native speed]
Eric: jitney
İçten: dolmuş[slowly - broken down by syllable]
İçten: dolmuş [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
İçten: durak [natural native speed]
Eric: stop, station
İçten: durak[slowly - broken down by syllable]
İçten: durak [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
İçten: dolmak [natural native speed]
Eric: to fill
İçten: dolmak[slowly - broken down by syllable]
İçten: dolmak [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
İçten: sahil [natural native speed]
Eric: shore
İçten: sahil[slowly - broken down by syllable]
İçten: sahil [natural native speed]
Eric: And last..
İçten: dönmek [natural native speed]
Eric: whirl, return, turn
İçten: dönmek[slowly - broken down by syllable]
İçten: dönmek [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is..
İçten: tarif etmek
Eric: meaning "to describe something." What can you tell us about this, İçten?
İçten: Tarif means ''recipe'' or ''description'' while etmek is an auxiliary verb meaning ''to do.''
Eric: How do we use this?
İçten: We use it to describe things like recipes or directions.
Eric: Is this a formal or informal expression?
İçten: It can be used for either situation.
Eric: Let’s have an example using this phrase.
İçten: For example, you can say.. Böreği nasıl yaptığını tarif etsene!
Eric: ..which means "Tell me the recipe for this pastry!" Okay, what's the next phrase?
İçten: kafası karışmak
Eric: meaning "to be confused." What does this mean, exactly?
İçten: It’s an idiom. It’s made up of the noun kafa which means ''head'' and the verb karışmak which means ''to mix'' or ''to confuse.''
Eric: So it literally means “to be confused in the head”?
İçten: That’s right. We use it when we’re confused because we can’t understand something or decide.
Eric: So if we don’t know what decision to make, we can use this?
İçten: Yes. It’s fine to use it in both formal and informal situations.
Eric: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
İçten: Sure. For example, you can say.. Anesteziden sonra kafam çok karıştı.
Eric: .. which means "I was very confused after the anesthesia." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you'll learn about time clauses like “after,” “before,” and “until.”
Eric: For this lesson, we’re switching gears and looking at adverbs.
İçten: Yes, we’ll look at three adverbs of time - “after,” “before” and “until.”
Eric: Let’s start with “after.”
İçten: “After” in Turkish is sonra, and it can be used as both a time and place adverb.
Eric: How do we use this to mean “after”?
İçten: Sonra can be used as an adverb, or in combination with the ablative noun suffix -den.
Eric: Can you give us an example using this?
İçten: It’s best to look at an example with an accompanying question, I think. We can use ne zaman to make a “when” question.
Eric: How about the question “When will you be home?” followed by the answer “I’ll be back after the movie.”
İçten: Eve ne zaman dönersin? Sinemadan sonra dönerim.
Eric: Next, let’s move onto “before.”
İçten: Önce is Turkish for “before.” It can be used to show that something happened earlier, or at a location that comes before a destination.
Eric: Again, let’s look at it with a question first. We can use the same question as we did with “after,” “when will you be home?”
İçten: That was Eve ne zaman dönersin?
Eric: But let’s use a different pattern.
İçten: We said that önce can be used for location too, so how about a sentence with nasıl, such as Sinemaya nasıl gideceğim?
Eric: That means “How can I get to the cinema?”
İçten: Bankadan hemen önce sola döneceksin.
Eric: “Turn left just before the bank.” And finally, let’s look at “until.”
İçten: The Turkish ‘’until’’ is created with kadar and a combination of case suffixes.
Eric: Again, let’s start with a question.
İçten: How about Eve nasıl döneceksin?
Eric: “How will you return home?”
İçten: Sahile kadar yürüyüp otobüse bineceğim.
Eric: “I’ll walk to the shore and get a bus”.

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
İçten: Güle güle.

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