Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Gabriella: Hello, and welcome to the Absolute Beginner series at TurkishPod101.com. This is season 1, lesson 25, Do you Remember the Turkish Grammar You’ve Learned in This Series?, I’m Gabriella.
Feyza: Merhaba. And I’m Feyza!
Gabriella: In this final lesson of the series, we'll review some of the basic grammar forms we’ve studied throughout this series.
Feyza: This conversation takes place at Hakan’s place. Hakan shows Merve and Bora his photo album.
Gabriella: Because they’re friends, they’re using informal language.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Gabriella: Are you ready for a mouth-watering lesson, dear listeners?
Feyza: This dialogue is about vacations! So we're going to introduce you to the top three ready-to-eat food souvenirs.
Gabriella: Let’s start with a healthy choice!
Feyza: Gün kurusu kayısı
Gabriella: "Sun-dried apricots." Did you know that Turkey is the leading apricot producer in the world?
Feyza: Yes. Indeed, they're first-class quality!
Gabriella: We especially recommend you buy sun-dried apricots if you’re interested in organic food.
Feyza: These products are dried naturally under the sun.
Gabriella: But how can we distinguish them from other apricots?
Feyza: Easy! They have a crimson-terra cotta color.
Gabriella: Feyza, why don’t you recommend the bright orange ones? They also look quite tempting.
Feyza: Those ones are chemically processed since they are dipped in hydrated lime.
Gabriella: Oh, I didn’t know! Our second edible souvenir is the famous Turkish delight
Feyza: Which is called lokum in Turkish.
Gabriella: This sugar-sprinkled Turkish delicacy is made out of cubes of thickened milk and fruit syrup.
Feyza: I think the international demand for Turkish delight has increased, especially after Narnia the movie!
Gabriella: Oh, I remember that scene. The White Witch tries to tempt one of the characters with a bowl of rose flavored Turkish delight.
Feyza: Yes! And we also recommend you try the unique taste of rose flavored lokum, which is güllü’ in Turkish. And also, you should try çifte kavrulmuş.
Gabriella: Meaning "double roasted with pistachio." So what’s your final recommendation Feyza?
Feyza: It’s cezerye, a confection made with caramelized carrots and nuts. Let’s not forget a pinch of shredded coconut that enriches the taste!
Gabriella: I guess our target group for this lesson are the ones with a sweet tooth.
Feyza: (laughs) But this one is a healthy choice as well.
Gabriella: How so?
Feyza: Well, it's usually recommended by cardiologists for their cardiac patients.
Gabriella: I suppose it is known that nuts have essential oils that are beneficial for the body.
Feyza: And carrots are definitely on the healthy side!
Gabriella: So where can our listeners find these souvenirs, Feyza?
Feyza: From any neighborhood kuruyemişçi
Gabriella: A store selling dried fruits and nuts.
VOCAB LIST
Gabriella: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Feyza: sene [natural native speed]
Gabriella: year
Feyza: sene [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Feyza: sene [natural native speed]
Next:
Feyza: neden [natural native speed]
Gabriella: why, reason
Feyza: neden [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Feyza: neden [natural native speed]
Next:
Feyza: evlenmek [natural native speed]
Gabriella: to marry, to get married
Feyza: evlenmek [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Feyza: evlenmek [natural native speed]
Next:
Feyza: tebrik [natural native speed]
Gabriella: congratulations
Feyza: tebrik [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Feyza: tebrik [natural native speed]
Next:
Feyza: haziran [natural native speed]
Gabriella: june
Feyza: haziran [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Feyza: haziran [natural native speed]
Next:
Feyza: ayrıca [natural native speed]
Gabriella: also, besides, furthermore
Feyza: ayrıca [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Feyza: ayrıca [natural native speed]
Next:
Feyza: sonrada [natural native speed]
Gabriella: and then
Feyza: sonrada [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Feyza: sonrada [natural native speed]
Next:
Feyza: geri gelmek [natural native speed]
Gabriella: to return back
Feyza: geri gelmek [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Feyza: geri gelmek [natural native speed]
And Last:
Feyza: harika [natural native speed]
Gabriella: superb, wonderful
Feyza: harika [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Feyza: harika [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Gabriella: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. What is our first word?
Feyza: Evlenmek
Gabriella: Meaning, "to get married" or "to marry someone."
Feyza: Actually, it literally means, "to obtain a house."
Gabriella: Very interesting. I guess the meaning comes from marriage being an establishment of a new household, right?
Feyza: Got it in one, Gabriella!.
Gabriella: How do you say "to divorce" in Turkish?
Feyza: Boşanmak.
Gabriella: It literally means "to make something loose, empty." How about "to engage"?
Feyza: Nişanlanmak. Actually nişan is a decorative honorary badge.
Gabriella: So this verb literally means to obtain that badge.
Feyza: Yes, and it symbolizes the unification of two people.
Gabriella: Okay, this is my last related question. How do you say "to bind with a promise to wed," like a promise ring?
Feyza: Oh, we call that sözlenmek. Söz means a "word" or "promise."
Gabriella: And what’s our last vocabulary word.
Feyza: Geri gelmek.
Gabriella: A modal verb meaning "to return" or "to reunite." You can easily use this word to describe the action of returning back to somewhere.
Feyza: For instance, returning to your home country.
Gabriella: Did you know that it also has a romantic connotation?
Feyza: Yes, it implies the sudden interest of a person who has broken up with you in the past.
Gabriella: Let’s give an example to help clarify this meaning.
Feyza: Çok yanlış yaptım ama o bana yine de geri geldi.
Gabriella: "I made a lot of mistakes, but he returned to me no matter what." Okay, now onto the grammar.
GRAMMAR POINT
Gabriella: As you know listeners, this is the last lesson of this Absolute Beginner Series.
Feyza: That’s why we've decided to highlight the grammar points that might be a little more challenging throughout this series.
Gabriella: For that reason, we created this lesson’s dialogue to illustrate these points with further examples.
Feyza: Please review the lesson notes of each lesson if you have questions involving other grammar points.
Gabriella: And don’t hesitate to post your comments or questions if you have any. Okay so which grammar point does our first example refer to?
Feyza: Noun cases
Gabriella: As you remember listeners, noun cases are a set of suffixes that change according to the vowel and consonant harmony rules.
Feyza: Yes, and their function is to modify the nouns, not in meaning, but in orientation.
Gabriella: Just like prepositions. Now, let’s review two of the five different noun cases we’ve studied so far.
Feyza: Locative and accusative cases.
Gabriella: Let’s begin with the locative case as our first example suggests.
Feyza: The locative case is constructed with -de or da, or te or ta.
Gabriella: And which to choose depends on vowel harmony rules. Feyza, can you tell our listeners the lesson number just in case they need further explanation?
Feyza: Sure! It was lesson 15.
Gabriella: Great! We’ve just said that the locative case corresponds to English prepositions. Now let’s list them.
Feyza: "in," "at," and "on." However, our listeners should keep in mind that these meanings are achieved through suffixes in Turkish.
Gabriella: Which means they attach themselves to the words where orientation is needed. Now let’s hear the example from our dialogue.
Feyza: Haziran-da
Gabriella: Meaning, "In June." So what’s our second point Feyza?
Feyza: The many uses of the interrogative suffix from lessons 21 and 23.
Gabriella: Do you remember our yes/no questions from lesson 21?
Feyza: These questions are asked with a set of suffixes that are located at the very end of the sentence.
Gabriella: Just before the question mark, if we want to be specific. Now let's hear the suffixes one more time from Feyza.
Feyza: -mi, -mı,- mu, or -mü depending on the vowel harmony rules.
Gabriella: Now here comes the challenge. Our example from the dialogue is affiliated with the special uses of interrogative suffixes.
Feyza: So please have a look at the grammar notes of lesson 21.
Gabriella: Do you remember that the interrogative suffix can also be used as an intensifier?
Feyza: Or to signify, "if," "as soon as," "when" and "whenever."
Gabriella: Don’t forget that it can also be used to negate a sentence to emphasize the meaning.
Feyza: And last but not least, it can change a statement into a question.
Gabriella: Which is called a tag question.
Feyza: In English, a tag question is located at the end of the sentence and usually separated by a coma.
Gabriella: So Feyza, let’s hear our dialogue and find out which of these exclusive uses our interrogative suffix refers to.
Feyza: Gerçekten mi?
Gabriella: Meaning, "really?" Can you guess which category it belongs to?
Feyza: This question shows doubt, uncertainty, and disbelief to the other person.
Gabriella: And all those implications make the connotation negative.
Feyza: So here, mi is used to highlight that negative emphasis.
Gabriella: So our example belongs to point 4 of lesson 21’s grammar point. Now let’s face our third challenge.
Feyza: Hang in there! We’ve almost made it!
Gabriella: It’s about the Turkish possessive suffixes which are covered in lessons 9 and 10. Let’s hear our example Feyza.
Feyza: Eşi ile tanışmak istiyorum.
Gabriella: And what’s our word?
Feyza: Eşi
Gabriella: Let’s hear the suffix!
Feyza: -i
Gabriella: There's the challenge. Can you tell whether it's the accusative suffix -i, meaning "the" in English, or the possessive suffix that shows ownership?
Feyza: The personal pronoun is absent, so it could be hard for our listeners to figure it out.
Gabriella: Then let’s give a clue!
Feyza: Eş, meaning "partner," refers to the future husband of Hakan’s sister. Like, onun eşi
Gabriella: Oh, that’s third person singular possessive suffix.
Feyza: Well done Gabriella!
Gabriella: Here comes our final example.
Feyza: Vay vay!
Gabriella: Meaning, "Wow!" This takes us on a journey to lesson number 16, Turkish interjections and exclamations.
Feyza: These interjections will make your Turkish dialogue flow smoothly.
Gabriella: And also more naturally. Turkish interjections are very expressive and dynamic.
Feyza: And allow you to make a verbal depiction of the dialogue you framed mentally.
Gabriella: So spice up your life with the Mediterranean spirit by reviewing these exclamations.
Feyza: We’ve made it Gabriella!
Gabriella: Yes! We’ve reached the end of the Absolute Beginner Series.
Feyza: We hope you enjoyed this grammatical journey as much as we did.
Gabriella: And learned more about the basics of Turkish grammar.
Feyza: It’s time to move on to more advanced grammar.
Gabriella: So we’ll see you in the next series! Thanks for listening, bye!
Feyza: Hoşçakalın!

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Hi Listeners! What do you think about Turkish grammar so far? What subjects would you like to study in our next series?